Six ACT Women chosen for NSW Country squad – By Barry Barnes, Thursday, 8 October 2009 – www.act.baseball.com.au

Six ACT Women chosen for NSW Country squad – By Barry Barnes, Thursday, 8 October 2009 – www.act.baseball.com.au


Amy Vickers, Kate Russell, Eliza Russell, Carly Jensen, Cathy Carroll, Claire Stephens.

The first ever ACT Womens Baseball side has returned home from a rain soaked weekend in the Illawarra region with their heads held high after an encouraging effort in their first ever competitive tournament.

The weekend only served to prove the potential the region has in its womens ranks with six girls chosen for the NSW Country training squad as they prepare for the Australian National Championships, due to take place early in the new year.

In a field of four sides including Illawarra, Central Coast and Newcastle, the ACT Womens team were never disgraced against some of the strongest opposition the state of NSW has to offer…

Batter up! A Visual History of Baseball in Florida – floridamemory.com

Batter up! A Visual History of Baseball in Florida – floridamemory.com

The All American Girls Baseball League was started in 1943 by Chicago Cubs owner Philip .K. Wrigley. With the absence of many professional male baseball players during WWII, Wrigley conceived the idea in an effort to maintain the popularity of baseball until the end of the war. Notable players in the league were photographed during their daily activities and training in Opa-locka Florida…

About “Signs of the Time” – Who invented umpires’ signals? Does anybody really know? – by Dorothy Jane Mills

About “Signs of the Time” – by Dorothy Jane Mills

Who invented umpires’ signals? Does anybody really know?

Relatives of the famous deaf and non-speaking big-league player William “Dummy” Hoy believe it was his participation in baseball that inspired umpires to use hand signals to supplement their calls of “safe,” “out,” and other events in the game. Those of the well-known umpire Bill “Catfish” Klem are sure that Klem started it all, mostly because of Klem’s constant insistence that he was the one who began using signs and that others copied him.

In “Signs of the Time,” two filmmakers, Don Casper and Jim Hughes, of Crystal Pix, Inc., have produced a solid and lively documentary about the controversy over who invented umpires’ signals. After showing us the way early umpires workd and then devoting considerable time to the evidence produced by the Hoy supporters and the claims of the Klem side, Casper and Hughes also bring in two well-known baseball historians, Dorothy Seymour Mills and Peter Morris, who because of their research know that even before Hoy and Klem participated in baseball, fans reacting to the difficulty of hearing umpires’ calls in the bigger baseball parks were asking the umps to add signals to their voice calls. The umpires hung back for a long time, fearing that these gyrations might detract from their dignity. Not until early in the 20th century did they all agree to give these signals, or “signs,” as they are called in baseball.

During 2009 “Signs of the Time” has been shown in many venues throughout the country, mostly at various film festivals. During the Annual Cooperstown Film Festival October 2-4, “Signs of the Time” became one of the thirteen entries in the competition and won the Award for Baseball Excellence. This Award is given to the film that excels in one or all of the following categories: research, historical context, appreciation of the game and the embodiment of the spirit of baseball.

Archive: “Annabelle Lee Again Arouses Poet’s Muse” – by K.C. Clapp – Grand Rapids Herald, July 10, 1945

Archive: “Annabelle Lee Again Arouses Poet’s Muse” – by K.C. Clapp – Grand Rapids Herald, July 10, 1945

It wasn’t so many hours ago
July 7, specifically,
That a maiden there pitched whom you may know
By the name of Annabelle Lee,
And she hurled so well that not a Chick hit,
Going down to her, one, two, three.

She was not wild, this talented child,
Who twirled so effectively.
And no free passes were handed out
By this stingy Annabelle Lee
But the base hits rang for the Fort Wayne gang
For a 6-0 victory.

And this is the reason as 3,000 know
Who witnessed her wizardry
That not a Chick could hit a lick
Off the slants of Annabelle Lee,
So they sharply dropped from second spot
To a humble berth in 3.
But Fort Wayne cheers its peach-clad dears
Because of Annabelle Lee.

The moon never beams without bringing me dreams
Of the curves of Annabelle Lee.
And the South Field lights will gleam many nights
Before such a sight I may see—
No hits by Ziegler or Tetzlaff or Eisen,
No hits by the bustling “B.”
No hits by Maguire or Petras or “Twi,”
Why? Because of Annabelle Lee.

-==-

Excerpt: I.N.K – Interesting Nonfiction for Kids:

The Curves of Annabelle Lee” – Posted by Sue Macy – Friday, October 3, 2008 – http://inkrethink.blogspot.com/

One of my favorite sports articles of all time is a retelling of the classic poem, “Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allan Poe. Only this version, written by K.C. Clapp of the Grand Rapids Herald in July 1945, was not the story of a lost love, but of a lost baseball game. The Annabelle Lee in Clapp’s poem was a left-handed pitcher for the Fort Wayne Daisies of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL). On July 7, 1945, she pitched nine innings of no-hit, no-run ball against Clapp’s hometown team, the Grand Rapids Chicks.

Annabelle Lee Harmon, a native of North Hollywood, California, died on July 3 [2008] at the age of 86, and as the baseball playoffs begin, it seems like the perfect time to remember her. Hardly any media outlets noted her passing, and that’s a pity, because she was a warm, elegant, delightful woman who made an indelible imprint on the national pastime. She played pro baseball for seven years and threw the AAGPBL’s first perfect game on July 29, 1944. Beyond that, she was the aunt of major league pitcher Bill Lee—and the person who the “Spaceman” credits with teaching him how to pitch.

My most vivid memory of Annabelle is from 1995, when the All-Americans met for a reunion at a resort in Indian Wells, California. Annabelle was there with her mother Hazel, who was close to 100 years old. The paperback edition of my book about the league, A Whole New Ball Game, had just come out, and I had traveled from the east coast to show it off to the women who inspired it. With me were two friends, including Felicia Halpert, a sportswriter and a storied softball player from the women’s leagues in Brooklyn, New York…

BaseballForAll Update – October 6, 2009

Dear Baseball Family,

Summer is over and Fall is upon us but there is still some great baseball to be played!

National Baseball Hall of Fame Film Festival
Last weekend, I was at the National Baseball Hall of Fame for their film festival. In addition to watching Girls of Summer, a documentary by Max Tash, on my 12u girls team and the history of women’s baseball, there was a fantastic film on women’s baseball in Cuba (named Major Leagues?). Our challenges to be recognized as women and baseball players is still a struggle around the world. Thank you to all of you who are fighting the good fight.

College Game
Unfortunately, the BFA college game has been postponed from this October to next Spring. All of the fields we looked at in New England, are being winterized by that October 23rd date. I encourage someone to run a college game in the west coast over the next few months. That would be wonderful.

12U Girls All Star Team Plays This Weekend.
After the success of our 12u Sparks team, I created another playing opportunity for the 12u. We play this weekend in a “boys” tournament. Three of our girls have thrown no hitters and one girl won her districts LL HR derby with 16 home runs. Six States and 2 countries will be represented. You can see our roster here: http://www.baseballglory.com/BaseBall_for_All/duquetteros.html

Recruiting Players for Australia
This January, BFA will be taking a women’s and 17u team to compete at Olympic Park in Sydney, Australia. We have only a couple of spots left on the 17u team, but are still recruiting for the women’s team. If you know a woman who loves baseball who is looking for international club play, please have her contact me. It would be great if we had different leagues represented on our roster. Here is the info: http://www.baseballglory.com/BaseBall_for_All/Australia.html

Girls Baseball Academy
Please mark your calendar for the BFA Girls’ International Baseball Academy over July 4th weekend. The Academy is for ages 9-16 and is for girls of all skill levels. Our 2010 BFA all star teams will be selected at this Academy. We expect about 150 girls to attend – creating an amazing haven for girls who love baseball. We will be looking for female instructors for this Academy as well. Details to be posted soon.

Good luck with the Fall tournaments!

Justine Siegal
Baseball For All
http://www.BaseballForAll.com

Blog: Girls Don’t Know Anything About Baseball [Not!]

Girls Don’t Know Anything About Baseball
Game reports, pictures, random thoughts and non-sequitors from a Texas Rangers fan meandering her way through the Rangers 2009 minor and major league seasons.

Terrific local Chicago news piece on the Chicago Gems Baseball Club!

Terrific local Chicago news piece on the Chicago Gems Baseball Club! <= click, here.

The American Women’s Baseball Federation National Championship Begins Play October 9th

The American Women’s Baseball Federation National Championship Begins Play October 9th

Huntingburg and Jasper, Indiana host five elite teams from across the country; The New England Red Sox will compete for their sixth national title.

Five teams will travel to Dubois County, Indiana to play their national championship series at League Stadium – the scene of the famous movie “A League of Their Own“. The teams and their origin leagues are:

1. Washington DC Thunder

2. San Francisco Bay Sox

3. Chicago Pioneers

4. Chicago Stealth

5. New England Red Sox

-==-

Game scores and standings…

For team rosters…

Check out League Stadium

Game Schedule

What to do in Dubois County

Read or download the tournament magazine

Hall of Fame’s Baseball Film Festival a hit – Troika of movies take home hardware in event’s fourth year – By Bill Francis – 10/05/2009 – baseballhalloffame.org

Hall of Fame’s Baseball Film Festival a hit – Troika of movies take home hardware in event’s fourth year – By Bill Francis – 10/05/2009 – baseballhalloffame.org

As big league baseball’s regular season came to a conclusion, except in the American League’s Central Division, the Fourth Annual Baseball Film Festival was ending another successful run.
The three-day long event, held at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, ran from Friday through Sunday. In all, 13 films of varied baseball subject matter, ranging in length from 12 to 90 minutes, were shown at the Hall’s Bullpen Theater.

The festivities came to an end Sunday afternoon with three awards handed out at a closing ceremony in the Museum’s Grandstand Theater. Capturing the Best Film Award was The Lost Son of Havana, the Award for Baseball Excellence went to Signs of the Time, and El Play captured the Award for Film Making Excellence…

-==-

Three-day event highlights baseball on big screen – National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum:

The festival included two films about the growth of girls and women’s baseball in the world today:

Girls of Summer (85 min.) A positive, respectful look at the WBL Sparks, the first all-girls baseball team to compete in a boys’ national tournament at the Cooperstown Dreams Park in Cooperstown, N.Y. Interspersed throughout the WBL Sparks’ story are historical segments telling the personal stories of the women who, since the mid-1850s, have played, coached and umpired baseball.

Major Leagues? (25 min.) This story from Cuban filmmaker Ernesto Perez Zambrano tells the story of women taking the field and playing baseball in Cuba.

Pioneering female coach in league of her own – By Douglas J. Guth, Senior Staff Reporter – Published: Friday, September 18, 2009 1:09 – clevelandjewishnews.com

Pioneering female coach in league of her own – By Douglas J. Guth, Senior Staff Reporter – Published: Friday, September 18, 2009 1:09 – clevelandjewishnews.com

“Girls don’t play baseball.”

Justine Siegal first heard that particular sporting cliché when she was 13. She’s heard it so much since then it ceases to have real meaning.

The Cleveland Heights native has spent her life ignoring that archaic chestnut. Siegal has not only played baseball for most of her 34 years, she recently became professional baseball’s first female coach, spending two months this summer as first-base coach with the Brockton Rox, an independent minor league baseball team in Brockton, Mass., just south of Boston.

Although recently let go by the organization for “financial reasons,” Siegal counts her summer coaching men’s baseball in the CanAm League as an eye-opening, at times bitter learning experience that she hopes encourages more girls and young women to pursue a career on the diamond.

Sporting long, blond-brown hair she ties into a ponytail for games, Siegal, a former pitcher and third baseman, is aware that baseball is seen as “man’s hallowed ground,” despite the fact that half of Major League Baseball’s fans are female. She knew she’d have to prove herself to Rox players as a competent, knowledgeable coach who was on the team as an instructor and not just “some girl” who was going to hit fly balls to outfielders…

Separate and Unequaled: Black Baseball in the District of Columbia – On view indefinitely

Separate and Unequaled: Black Baseball in the District of Columbia – On view indefinitely – Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum – 1901 Fort Place, SE, Washington, D.C.

Back by popular demand after a recent successful run at the Historical Society of Washington, D.C., a condensed version of this exhibition is on view at the museum. From Reconstruction to the second half of the 20th century, baseball, the great American pastime, was played in Washington, D.C., on segregated fields. “Separate and Unequaled” looks at the phenomenal popularity and community draw of this sport when played by African Americans. Featured are such personalities as Josh Gibson and “Buck” Leonard, star players of the Negro Leagues most celebrated team, the Washington Homestead Grays. The show also highlights community teams that gave rise to the various amateur, collegiate and semi-pro black baseball teams and leagues. For special viewing hours and tours, call 202.633.4844.

Scratch that…: Knuckleball Girl decides on college over pro baseball as a career path By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS (CP) – October 2, 2009

Knuckleball Girl decides on college over pro baseball as a career path
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS (CP) – October 2, 2009

KOBE, Japan — Eri Yoshida, the 17-year-old high school student who became Japan’s first female professional baseball player and globally renowned as the “Knuckleball Girl,” has turned her attention to education after struggling in her first season as a pro.

Yoshida pitched in her final game in the financially troubled Kansai Independent League on Thursday, working one scoreless inning of relief as her Kobe Cruise 9 lost 9-4 to the Kishu Rangers.

“I tried not to think it would be my last outing,” said Yoshida. “I just went to the mound with the same mindset that I’ve had all season…”

-==-

Schoolgirl to leave Japan pro league – 1 October 2009 – 1:20 p.m. EDT – From Agence France-Presse

TOKYO (AFP) – A 17-year-old schoolgirl who became the first female to play alongside men in Japanese professional baseball will leave her team after just one year to go to university, a team spokeswoman said Thursday.
Eri Yoshida, nicknamed “Princess Knuckle”, was drafted last year for a new independent league team, the Kobe 9 Cruise, which praised her side-armed knuckleball, a low-speed style of pitching.

But after a year-long contract with Kobe and having played just a handful of games, Yoshida has decided to leave the team to go to university, a club spokeswoman said.

“She wants to become a baseball instructor in the future,” the spokeswoman said. “So she wants to study at university for it. The team supported her decision…”

Cooperstown Baseball Bracelet – Girls Got Game

A baseball bracelet specially designed as a stylish approach to a woman’s passion for the game.

The bracelet is for all those moms who make daily sacrifices to ensure their children are at practices and games to play the game America loves, for women who enjoy the game for the sheer emotion that comes with great plays, hometown favorites and quality time spent with their families and friends, and for girls of all ages who dare to dream and play hard each and every day. Quite simply, it’s a woman’s turn…

Maggie Hall, pictured here at age 9, playing ball for Cooperstown Youth Baseball’s Minor League during a 2005 regular season game in which Maggie hit for the cycle. Undoubtedly, Maggie’s fondest baseball memory.

Maggie, whose favorite positions are catcher and 2nd base, played three years for the Minor League. An energetic player, Maggie is known for her offensive play. Once on base, consider the next stolen. Her hitting, speed and knowledge of the game landed her a starting position on the 2005 and 2006 All-Star Team.

Maggie exemplifies the passion and pride that is shared by youth and adults across America while playing and supporting hometown baseball.

Excerpt from press release:

April 4, 2006 — Cooperstown, NY — If you live in Cooperstown, New York, in the shadow of the National Baseball Hall of Fame, you think about baseball. And when Jennifer Stewart and Anne Hall, two long-time Cooperstown residents, thought about baseball, they realized there was something missing for women and girls. “Women enjoy celebrating and supporting the community, spending quality time with family and friends and rooting for our home team. That’s the passion women have about America’s game.” Hall says…

The young blonde woman the media called “The Blonde Bombshell.”

A running outfielder, Pat Keagle played for the Grand Rapid Chicks of the AAGPBL during the mid-1940s. Keagle was selected as an All-Star in 1946 when she led all outfielders in the women’s baseball league in hitting.

Right off the start, the media’s newspaper writers liked what they saw and Keagle quickly picked up the nickname “the Blonde Bombshell.” Attendance rose from 1,600 per home game to well over 2,000 to see the young outfielder.

Four films honor women and girls in Baseball – as players and as fans – Fourth annual Baseball Film Festival returns Oct. 2-4 – Three-day event highlights baseball on big screen – National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Three-day event highlights baseball on big screen – National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. — The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum will recognize the twin traditions of baseball and film when, for the fourth consecutive year, it hosts the Baseball Film Festival in Cooperstown, Oct. 2-4.

Thirteen films, with themes ranging from women in baseball to a baseball league in Israel, will be screened on Friday, Oct. 2, through Sunday, Oct. 4, as filmmakers compete for three awards given at the conclusion of the festival: the Best Film Award, the Award for Baseball Excellence and the Award for Film Making Excellence. The Baseball Film Festival is made possible by the generous support of New York Central Mutual Insurance Company.

Tickets for the screening of Film Festival entries are free of charge but are limited and must be reserved. Members can reserve their tickets immediately, and any remaining seats will made available to the general public beginning Monday, Sept. 28, by calling the Membership Department at 607-547-0397 or by visiting the membership desk in the Museum. The awards ceremony will be held on Sunday, Oct. 4, at 3 p.m. in the Grandstand Theater and is open to the public. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis.

A complete list of the films to be screened and competing for top honors during the weekend:

Session 1
Friday, Oct. 2, 6 p.m.

The Lost Son of Havana (105 min.)
After 46 years in exile, former Major League Baseball star Luis Tiant returns to Cuba, where he encounters unexpected demons and receives unexpected gifts from his family.

Signs of the Time (60 min.)
Where did baseball hand signals come from? In exploring this seemingly simple question, the feature-length documentary Signs of the Time unveils stories of inspiration and controversy that transcend sports. Narrated by Academy Award-winner Richard Dreyfuss, the film unravels the mystery surrounding baseball’s greatest innovation.

Session 2
Saturday, Oct. 3, 9 a.m.

Girls of Summer (85 min.)
A positive, respectful look at the WBL Sparks, the first all-girls baseball team to compete in a boys’ national tournament at the Cooperstown Dreams Park in Cooperstown, N.Y. Interspersed throughout the WBL Sparks’ story are historical segments telling the personal stories of the women who, since the mid-1850s, have played, coached and umpired baseball.

Major Leagues? (25 min.)
This story from Cuban filmmaker Ernesto Perez Zambrano tells the story of women taking the field and playing baseball in Cuba.

Session 3
Saturday, Oct. 3, 12:30 p.m.

We Believe (100 min.)
From the director of The U.S. vs. John Lennon comes a new documentary film celebrating the unusual love affair between a great city, Chicago, and one of its baseball teams, the Cubs. Like any relationship, it has its highs and lows, joys and sorrows, moments of exhilaration and heartbreak. About hope, faith, optimism and loyalty, this film is about America, family and tradition. But first and foremost, We Believe is an entertaining movie, packed with emotion, humor, wonderful human moments and unique insight.

The Farm Team (15 min.)
A first-hand look at the challenges of the grounds crew of a Minor League Baseball team in Mobile, Ala., the rainiest city in the United States. It’s a portrait of three hard-working guys who not only love the sport of baseball, but also the field the game is played on.

Session 4
Saturday, Oct. 3, 3:30 p.m.

A Braves New World (55 min.)
A Braves New World chronicles how the “Miracle in Milwaukee” began the shift westward of America’s pastime. Includes seldom-seen archival footage and photos, along with over 25 on-camera interviews, including former Braves players, management and sportswriters.

Session 5
Saturday, Oct. 3, 7 p.m.

She’s Baseball Mad! (12 min.)
Did women save Major League Baseball in Seattle? A look at the female connection with baseball and the role women played in building the most family-friendly ballpark in the nation.

Road to the Big Leagues (60 min.)
How does a tiny island roughly the size of Connecticut produce baseball superstars like Pedro Martinez, Vladimir Guerrero, Hanley Ramirez, Sammy Sosa and David Ortiz? Have you ever wondered what their journey was like to the pros? What about for the thousands that try but never make it big? Road to the Big Leagues tells the story of one of baseball’s most-heralded breeding grounds, the Dominican Republic, and provides a close examination of its special brand of baseball.

A Shortstop in China (50 min.)
Shortly after being enshrined in Cooperstown, Cal Ripken Jr. was named public diplomacy envoy by the U.S. State Department. True to form, America’s Iron Man embraced the challenge of his new career as diplomat. His first mission: travel to China and share the game of baseball — the Ripken Way.

Session 6
Sunday, Oct. 4, 9 a.m.

El Play (30 min.)
El Play tells the story of Jairo Candelario, a young aspiring baseball player from San Pedro de Macoris, a small city in the Dominican Republic famous for birthing some of the world’s most talented baseball players. The film paints a detailed portrait of Jairo and his tireless commitment to the game as he balances his hopes of signing a professional contract with the reality of its improbability. Interviewed are professional scouts, coaches, family members, a baseball historian and San Pedro-born Robinson Cano, the second baseman of the New York Yankees.

Holy Land Hardball (83 min.)
When Boston bagelmaker Larry Baras wanted to create a professional baseball league in Israel, his idea was met with incredulity, dismissal and even hostility. He attempted it anyway. Among the ballplayers swept up in his unlikely quest: a 41-year-old father of three with a Peter Pan complex; a 27-year-old Brooklyn artist/DJ still finding himself after the disappointment of not being drafted out of college; a 34-year-old father-to-be whose own father, now deceased, fought for Israel’s independence in 1948; and a 22-year-old African-American who was told by a preacher at a young age he would one day “play in front of God’s people.” Also along for the ride are former Jewish Major Leaguers Art Shamsky, Ken Holtzman and Ron Blomberg as team managers in the Israel Baseball League.

Session 7
Sunday, Oct. 4, 1 p.m.

Ghost Player (54 min.)
Field of Dreams Ghost Player is a documentary that chronicles the adventures and misadventures of a boisterous and unlikely team of middle-aged Iowa baseball players. In 1989, Hollywood went to Iowa to shoot Field of Dreams. Little did anyone know this blockbuster would spawn a comedic baseball show starring local ballplayers that had an 18-year run and traveled the world.

Why Do Men Need a League of Their Own? – September 26, 2009 – gelfmagazine.com

Why Do Men Need a League of Their Own? – By GAREY RIS – September 26, 2009 – gelfmagazine.com

Lilly Jacobson has always been enamored of baseball. From the time she was a little girl, Jacobson watched baseball with her mother and played baseball with her friends, moving up over the years to Little League, where “Little Miss RBI” excelled playing on a boys team.

The older she got, though, the more she was isolated, despite her undeniable talent. After playing ball both in high-school and at Vassar College, Jacobson’s dream of a professional career playing the sport she loves was over.

But women have a long history playing baseball that author Jennifer Ring explores in Stolen Bases: Why American Girls Don’t Play Baseball. Ring, who is Jacobson’s mother, notes the efforts men have made over the years to reshape baseball as a man’s game and limit women to playing softball. It’s an issue as vexing today for Ring as it was when she began writing this book years ago.

Gelf Magazine’s interview with Ring, a professor of political science and former director of women’s studies at the University of Nevada, was conducted by email, and has been edited for length and clarity. Her daughter’s struggle to play baseball was Ring’s motivation for writing Stolen Bases. She tells Gelf why she thinks women can play in the majors, how baseball used to be more gender-blind, and why softball is no substitute…

Girls play baseball, too by BOB COOK – YOUR KID’S NOT GOING PRO blog – trueslant.com/bobcook/

Girls play baseball, too by BOB COOK – YOUR KID’S NOT GOING PRO blog – trueslant.com/bobcook/

You wouldn’t know it from the rosters at the Little League World Series, but there’s a groundswell growing to let girls play baseball.

Growing only now, you say, 35 years after Little League was forced by lawsuit to allow girls to play? (The ban came into effect after the 1950 season, when a girl posed as a boy named “Tubby” to play in Corning, N.Y.) And what do I mean, “let?” Isn’t this issue settled?

Not by a long shot…

Phys Ed: Preventing ACL Injuries in Girls – By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS – September 9, 2009 – nytimes.com

Phys Ed: Preventing ACL Injuries in Girls – By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS – September 9, 2009 – nytimes.com

Earlier this year, researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital published the most detailed and revealing case study to date of an anterior cruciate ligament rupture waiting to happen in a young girl. The study grew out of the researchers’ ongoing, large-scale examination of ACL-tear risk factors, which had enrolled hundreds of young, female athletes, measured and monitored them, and assigned some to prevention training programs. The girl in the case report hadn’t received training. She was 11 when she joined the study, a small, skinny, prepubescent basketball player. Each year, the researchers noted her height, weight, joint looseness, muscle strength, and biomechanics, using sophisticated motion-capture technology to study how she leaped and landed. At each session, as might have been expected, she’d lengthened, developing coltish legs and a slight but noticeable tendency to wobble and land knock-kneed when she hopped off of a box.

At age 14, charging down the line during a game, she felt her knee pop and collapse. Her ACL had ripped…

Phys Ed: Can Vitamin D Improve Your Athletic Performance? – By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS – September 23, 2009, 12:01 AM – nytimes.com

Phys Ed: Can Vitamin D Improve Your Athletic Performance? – By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS – September 23, 2009 – nytimes.com

When scientists at the Australian Institute of Sport recently decided to check the Vitamin D status of some of that country’s elite female gymnasts, their findings were fairly alarming. Of the 18 gymnasts tested, 15 had levels that were “below current recommended guidelines for optimal bone health,” the study’s authors report. Six of these had Vitamin D levels that would qualify as medically deficient. Unlike other nutrients, Vitamin D can be obtained by exposure to ultraviolet radiation from sunlight, as well as through foods or supplements. Of course, female gymnasts are a unique and specialized bunch, not known for the quality or quantity of their diets, or for getting outside much.

But in another study presented at a conference earlier this year, researchers found that many of a group of distance runners also had poor Vitamin D status. Forty percent of the runners, who trained outdoors in sunny Baton Rouge, Louisiana, had insufficient Vitamin D. “It was something of a surprise,” says D. Enette Larson-Meyer, an assistant professor in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Wyoming and one of the authors of the study…

His Coach is a Woman – Robin Wallace: Marblehead’s Comeau will continue baseball career at Bryant – By Bill Kipouras, Staff writer – September 23, 2009 – salemnews.com

Marblehead’s Comeau will continue baseball career at Bryant – By Bill Kipouras, Staff writer – September 23, 2009 – salemnews.com

Bryant College has recruited perhaps the only pitching prospect in the country who was tutored by a female pitching coach in high school.

Marblehead pitching ace Evan Comeau has committed to Division 1 Bryant College. The 16-year-old senior right-hander will attend the Smithfield, R.I., school beginning in the fall of 2010.

From Supporting our Brothers, Sons and Dads, too…

In doing so, he praised his mound mentor, Robin Wallace, for her help in establishing the pitching technique that enabled him to post a 7-1 record and 2.20 earned run average as a high school junior last spring. He also had 51 strikeouts in 47 innings.

“Robin refined everything for me (pitching-wise). I was just a hard thrower when I was a sophomore, and she taught me what I needed mechanically until I got things right,” said Comeau. “She showed me a lot besides refining my techniques…”

Dorothy Elizabeth Montgomery, who played two seasons in the All American Girls Professional Baseball League, died on September 17, 2009

Dorothy Elizabeth Montgomery, who played two seasons in the All American
Girls Professional Baseball League, died on September 17, 2009:

http://www2.mem.com/ContentDisplay.aspx?ID=17144918

http://www.aagpbl.org/players/index.cfm?do=player.details&playerid=166

Australian Womens Squad on track for a best ever performance at 2010 World Cup by Cassandra Sedgman, Friday, 18 September 2009 – www.nsw.baseball.com.au

Australian Womens Squad on track for a best ever performance at 2010 World Cup by Cassandra Sedgman, Friday, 18 September 2009 – www.nsw.baseball.com.au

This article was supplied by Australian Women’s squad member Amy McCann

The 2010 IBAF Women’s World Cup may still be almost a year away, but after finishing fourth at the past three events, the Australian women’s squad has begun preparations in an attempt to capture an elusive medal.

Twenty six of the country’s elite players recently met in Sydney for an intensive four day Australian Women’s camp held at Blacktown’s Olympic Stadium.

The Coaching staff of John Gaynor (Head Coach/NSW), Tim Ballard (Pitching Coach/VIC) and Dominic Ruggiero (Assistant Coach/VIC) selected the 36-member squad after performances at the 2009 Australian Championships in April.

The squad has a rich blend of youth and experience with ten ‘rookies’, and fifteen members of the team which narrowly missed 2008 World Cup bronze, selected…

“…. It started simply enough, a simple announcement that read as follows from the Netherlands Women’s Baseball group on Facebook…”

By Roland Morin of http://internationalgrowthofbaseball.blogspot.com/

Team Photo
http://www.dameshonkbal.hyves.nl/album/18052331/Dameshonkbal/nwCnHgl3/photos/228276339/0/6QZI/

TOP: Rob Cordemans (player Dutch national team, one of the best (if not the best) pitchers of the Netherlands), Natascha Schouten, Jessica Kroeskop, Annelieke Swinkels, Linde Gerritsen, Yvonne Schonenborn, Irin Steenaart, Miranda Noordenbos, Loes Asmus, Ivette van Putten (Assistant Coach, traveling secretary and founder), Percy Isenia (Head Coach and founder).
BOTTOM: Minke Blok, Eveliene Swinkels, Anika van den Heuvel, Marlinda Becker.

Team Photo of very first team
http://www.dameshonkbal.hyves.nl/album/18052331/Dameshonkbal/nwCnHgl3/photos/120268645/0/-Kr3/
Caption
The original Pink Panthers, the 1st Netherlands womens baseball team, from their website http://www.dameshonkbal.hyves.nl/
TOP: Ivette van Putten(Assistant Coach, traveling secretary and founder), Jessica Kroeskop, Irin Steenaart, Percy Isenia(Head Coach), Yvonne Schonenborn, Miranda Noordenbos, Jet Vermeulen, Clare Donald, Thari Thiefenbach, Karolina Wasilewski, Kimberley Kleinhuizen, Loes Asmus.
BOTTOM: Etty Fingal, Debbie Vaes, Anika van den Heuvel, Demi Pors.
Not pictured: Linde Gerritsen, Maxime Heinsbroek, Janiska Wilms

…. It started simply enough, a simple announcement that read as follows from the Netherlands Women’s Baseball group on Facebook:

Host: Women’s Baseball Netherlands
Type: Sports – Sporting Event
Network: Global
Date: Sunday, September 20, 2009
Time: 5:00pm – 8:00pm
Location: Neptunus stadium
City/Town: Rotterdam, Netherlands
Email: womensbaseball_nl@hotmail.com
A selection of our women baseball players against a selection team of Neptunus on the main field right after Netherlands – Cuba.

A second glance led to a flurry of questions back and forth across the Atlantic. Neptunus is a pretty good men’s team and I was still a little ignorant on the status of the Netherlands women’s baseball program. On top of that, the preceding men’s game, Netherlands vs Cuba, is probably the marquis match up in that bracket of the Baseball World Cup.

Ivette van Putten, a driving force behind the Netherlands Women’s Baseball effort kindly set me straight. Such matches are not rare; the Netherlands currently boasts only 1 women’s baseball team, the Pink Panthers, who are based in the southwest, in Zwijndrecht. Therefore, the only games in the Netherlands are with men’s teams. Issues derailed an early 2009 match up with a U.S. women’s squad, put together by Tiffany Brooks, as well as plans for the Netherlands to travel to the Women’s Baseball World Series in Phoenix, Arizona in mid-October, at Tiffany’s invitation [which has since been canceled due to a lack of teams participating]. The Netherlands program has yet to secure substantial sponsors beside themselves. The women will be playing against Neptunus’s second team players, a better skills match up with the women. Van Putten’s players’ skill levels range from highly skilled all the way down to beginner.

However, additional teams are being/will be formed. A second team, the Angels, is being formed in the northwest. Plans are in the offing to form 3 other teams in the near future, in the south, northeast and central portions of the country. There is a lot of interest from prospective players around the country, and Ivette is resolving issues of location as she measures interest, participation and transportation issues from the prospective players.

Ivette has been planning this since she was 12 years old when she heard that all too familiar line which I’ll let her state, “When I was 12 years old I had my mind set on playing baseball only to be told that because I’m a girl I could only play softball. I was very surprised to hear that, but thought ‘oh well I’ll wait a couple of years’. But then I turned 18 and still there was no baseball for women. So I decided I was going to set it up someday, somehow.”

Netherlands women’s baseball is basically a two-pronged effort at the top. Van Putten and her boyfriend of ten years, Percy Isenia, the 1B/DH and a star of the Netherlands national team for most of ten years, until retiring recently. Isenia is the coach and trainer for the team. He teaches the game to prospective women players, as early as age 15, many of whom also play softball, through the team and Isenia Baseball Clinics, a company he owns and operates. Both he and Ivette work and do some recruiting through the clinic, as well through the websites and word of mouth. They have received some help. Robert Eenhoorn, the former fantastically successful coach of the Hoofdklasse Neptunus team and then Netherlands national team, has been one the effort’s biggest backers. Eenhoorn retired to become commissioner of the Dutch baseball union KNBSB, their national federation. He helped the women secure this exhibition during the Baseball World Cup.

Dameshonkbal (literally, women’s baseball in Dutch) was formed on September 28, 2007. Originally, Ivette and Percy wanted to create an all women’s league within 3 years, with a national team and an entry in the World Championships years later. However, with the support of the IBAF this year for women’s baseball, the Netherlands has stepped up their efforts and has requested that the IBAF allow them to enter the World Championships next year. The Netherlands national team will be formed over the next 6 months with Isenia as coach and van Putten assisting and handling the arrangements (assistant coach and traveling secretary, all-in-one). Try-outs for the national team will begin September 26th in Zwijndrecht. However, they have not yet heard if their request will be honored. They have also stepped up their marketing effort with high visibility events such as the exhibition game at the Baseball World Cup.

But for today, the rosters have yet to be formed, awaiting the results of the ongoing softball season to determine which women will play. The softball regular season ended last weekend, the first weekend of September, and some of Netherlands Women’s Baseball’s best players may be in the playoffs and unable to play in this exhibition. The Netherlands has a two tier system of prospects, and will put the best possible team on the field. Ivette, Percy and the rest will continue to teach and make baseball available to young women, and continue to help young women in the Netherlands realize dreams that Ivette had to wait so long for, and finally had to create herself.

Women’s baseball league plays Saturdays in Bedford Park – Diamonds are the best friend of women who love playing hardball – By Mike Helfgot – Special to the Tribune – September 4, 2009 – chicagotribune.com

Women’s baseball league plays Saturdays in Bedford Park – Diamonds are the best friend of women who love playing hardball – By Mike Helfgot – Special to the Tribune – September 4, 2009 – chicagotribune.com

It’s 9 o’clock on a Saturday morning in Bedford Park, game time, but they’re a couple players and an umpire shy of the first pitch.

Members of Skyline, the team in the yellow uniforms, are scattered behind their dugout, mingling with the smattering of fans in attendance.

“Are we playing baseball today?” Christine Devane shouts to her teammates. “Or bridge?”

“Bridge,” a teammate responds. “Yeah, bridge sounds good,” says another.

They were joking, of course, although society says they’re not really the right demographic for either. And if you want to fire them up, tell them that.

They are the Chicago Women’s Baseball League, which is composed of four teams that play Saturday mornings in Bedford Park all summer. Ages range from 15 to mid-40s, and skill sets vary just as greatly. They play 12 regular season games and finish with two weeks of playoffs in late September…

Welcome to the Baseball Rose Homepage…

Welcome to the Baseball Rose Homepage…

A friend is getting married and using them – she is one of the most successful people on the planet developing baseball opportunity for girls…

Note: I am not at all affiliated with this seller – I do not profit from pointing this out to you – but think they are really terrific and hope you each enjoy them!

Awesome Baseball Girl Gifts for Purchase to Wear!

Awesome Baseball Girl Gifts for Purchase to Wear!

Note: I am not at all affiliated with this seller – I do not profit from pointing this out to you – but think they are really terrific and hope you each enjoy wearing them!

Caster Semenya Aint 8 Feet Tall – By Dave Zirin – August 26, 2009 – edgeofsports.com

Caster Semenya Aint 8 Feet Tall – By Dave Zirin – August 26, 2009 – edgeofsports.com

If you aspire to be a star woman athlete but have no aspirations to appear in Playboy’s Women of the Olympics issue, you are far better off being from South Africa than the United States. The Western media’s handling of the story of Caster Semenya, the gold-medal-winning 18-year-old South African runner, has been at best simplistic and at worst repellent. In a salacious, drooling tone, “Is she really a he?” is the extent of their curiosity. On various radio shows, I’ve been asked, “Why does she talk like a man?” No one defines what “a man” is supposed to talk like. Or, “Do you think she’s really a dude? Is this a Crying Game thing?” I’ve heard it all this week, and most of the questions say far more about the insecurities of the questioners than about Semenya’s situation…

Op-Ed: No More Sex Testing In Sports – David Zirin – August 24, 2009 – npr.org

Op-Ed: No More Sex Testing In Sports – By David Zirin – August 24, 2009 – npr.org

Listen to the story, here.

South African sprinter Caster Semenya won the women’s 800 meter race in Berlin at the World Athletics Championship. Following her victory, questions surfaced about her sex.

18-year-old Semenya has since had to undergo a series of tests to determine her sex.

In a piece in The Nation with Sherry Wolf, sports writer Dave Zirin argues that sex testing is outdated and humiliating, because “gender — that is, how we comport and conceive of ourselves — is a remarkably fluid social construction.” Further, Zirin maintains “physical sex is far more ambiguous and fluid than is often imagined or taught.” He calls for an end to the practice of sex testing.

Caster Semenya: The Idiocy of Sex Testing – by DAVE ZIRIN & SHERRY WOLF – August 21, 2009 – thenation.com

Caster Semenya: The Idiocy of Sex Testing – by DAVE ZIRIN & SHERRY WOLF – August 21, 2009 – thenation.com

World-class South African athlete Caster Semenya, age 18, won the 800 meters in the International Association of Athletics Federations World Championships on August 19. But her victory was all the more remarkable in that she was forced to run amid a controversy that reveals the twisted way international track and field views gender.

The sports world has been buzzing for some time over the rumor that Semenya may be a man, or more specifically, not “entirely female.” According to the newspaper The Age, her “physique and powerful style have sparked speculation in recent months that she may not be entirely female.” From all accounts an arduous process of “gender testing” on Semenya has already begun. The idea that an 18-year-old who has just experienced the greatest athletic victory of her life is being subjecting to this very public humiliation is shameful to say the least.
Her own coach Michael Seme contributed to the disgrace when he said, “We understand that people will ask questions because she looks like a man. It’s a natural reaction and it’s only human to be curious. People probably have the right to ask such questions if they are in doubt. But I can give you the telephone numbers of her roommates in Berlin. They have already seen her naked in the showers and she has nothing to hide…”

Chicago Pioneers – Cooperstown Dreams Park 2009 Week #13 – August 29, 2009 – “Cooperstown Classic”

Chicago Pioneers
Cooperstown Dreams Park 2009 Week #13 – August 29, 2009 – “Cooperstown Classic”

Players:

Danielle Allen
Sophie Allen
Amy Balich
Shannon Crawford
Alyssa Yesenia de Chene
Natalie Dudek
Taylor Gomez
Kayla Haberstich
Margaret Mahar
Alexis Parra
Indigo Pellegrini de Paur
Olivia Post
Lacey Rae Yahnke

Coaches:

Arthur Parra Sr.
Danielle Pauly
Brian Post
Greg Stegeman
Linda Marie Yahnke

The Council on Women and Girls’ new web site – WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26TH, 2009 AT 12:50 PM EST

From The Council on Women and Girls

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26TH, 2009 AT 12:50 PM

The Council on Women and Girls’ new web site

THE WHITE HOUSE

Office of the Press Secretary
___________________________________________________________________________
For Immediate Release August 26, 2009

WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY, 2009
– – – – – – –
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Today, our country renews its commitment to freedom and justice for all our citizens. As we prepare to celebrate this women’s day of equality, we reflect on the sacrifices once made to allow women and girls the basic rights and choices we freely exercise today. The future we leave to our daughters and granddaughters will be determined by our willingness to build on the achievements of our past and move forward as one people and one Nation. The fight for women’s equality is not a woman’s agenda, but an American agenda…

-==-

The Council on Women and Girls’ new web site

Posted by Christina M. Tchen

Welcome to our new website! As the Executive Director of the Council, I’m very excited to launch this site as we commemorate Women’s Equality Day on August 26. On this day when we remember the bravery and struggles that won women the right to vote, we are very pleased to add this website to share with everyone the work of this Administration to address the issues of concern to women and girls. The mission of the White House Council on Women and Girls is to ensure that every part of the federal government takes into account the needs of women and girls in the policies we draft, the programs we create, the legislation we support. Through this site you will be able to meet the member of the Council and the key staff in each agency who are charged with meeting this charge from the President.

This site also gives you information on the work we have been doing through the Council highlighting the Anniversary of Title IX, working on health reform, and joining the Vice President in the appointment of a White House Advisor to the President on Violence Against Women. We hope that you will come back often for updates as we and each of the members of the Council moves forward with our work. One of our first steps has been for each agency to assess their current resources addressing women and girls, and to begin planning for the future. Those reports have all been submitted to us, we are reviewing them, and we thank everyone in the agencies who worked on them. We will be posting the reports on line in the near future.

I hope that you will use this site and share it with others. We want you to come back and visit us often to learn what is happening throughout the Administration on issues concerning women and girls.

Thank you for your support.

Christina M. Tchen is Executive Director of the Council on Women and Girls and the Director of the White House Office of Public Engagement

WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY, 2009 – A PROCLAMATION – BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA – BARACK OBAMA – August 26, 2009 – Office of the Press Secretary – THE WHITE HOUSE

THE WHITE HOUSE

Office of the Press Secretary
___________________________________________________________________________
For Immediate Release August 26, 2009

WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY, 2009
– – – – – – –
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Today, our country renews its commitment to freedom and justice for all our citizens. As we prepare to celebrate this women’s day of equality, we reflect on the sacrifices once made to allow women and girls the basic rights and choices we freely exercise today. The future we leave to our daughters and granddaughters will be determined by our willingness to build on the achievements of our past and move forward as one people and one Nation. The fight for women’s equality is not a woman’s agenda, but an American agenda.

We honor the resilience, accomplishments, and history of all women in the United States. We celebrate the courageous women who fought to uphold a fundamental principle within our Constitution the right to vote and in so doing, protected the cornerstone of our vibrant democracy. These visionaries of the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 sought to ensure that our country lived up to its founding ideals. Although only one, Charlotte Woodward, at the age of 81, had the opportunity to exercise her newfound right, the struggle reminds us that no righteous cause is a lost one. We also commemorate women like Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, a poet and lecturer who formed the National Association of Colored Women; Antonia Pantoja, a tireless advocate of education equality within the Latino community; Sarah Winnemucca, a voice for peace within the Native American community; and Patsy Mink, author of Title IX and the first woman of color and Asian American woman elected to the United States Congress. These women’s talents, and the contributions of countless others, built upon the framework of 1848 and forged paths for future generations.

Our Nation has come a long way since that ground-breaking convention in New York. Women have occupied some of the most significant positions in government. They have delivered justice from the bench of our highest court, fought for our country in foreign lands, discovered cures to diseases, and joined the ranks of the greatest business leaders of our time. Female college graduates now outnumber their male counterparts. Women have sought equality through government, demonstrated by the signing of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009, and the establishment of the White House Council on Women and Girls. They have sought equality through advocacy, exemplified by the efforts of thousands of women’s organizations. America has made significant progress toward becoming the fair and just society the suffragists once envisioned.

Yet, today, our work remains unfinished. Far too many adult women remain mired in poverty. Women are still subject to pervasive discrimination at school and harassing conduct in the workplace. Women make, on average, only 78 cents for every dollar paid to men. Underrepresented in many facets of our economic and public life, from government to boardrooms to the sciences, women have yet to eradicate all barriers to professional development.

We stand at a moment of unparalleled change and a time for reflection and hope. We cannot allow the vibrant energy and passionate commitment of our trailblazing women to fade, and we can never forget the responsibility we bear to the ideals of liberty and equality for all. Each generation of successful women serves as a catalyst to empower, enlighten, and educate the next generation of girls and boys, and we must devote ourselves to promoting this catalyst for change now and in the future.

On this Women’s Equality Day, we resolve to continue the important work of our Nation’s foremothers and their successors, and turn their vision of a more equal America into our reality.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim August 26, 2009, as Women’s Equality Day. I call upon the people of the United States to celebrate the achievements of women and recommit themselves to the goal of true gender equality in this country.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fifth day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth.

BARACK OBAMA

Baseball Tryout on this Sunday August 30, 2009 – 11am-2pm @ McCoy Field – 600 Stimmel Rd. Columbus, OH 43223 – Columbus Women’s Baseball League

Sunday, August 30, 2009 – 11am-2pm @ McCoy Field – 600 Stimmel Rd. Columbus, OH 43223
Free hot dogs and Vitamin water for all players!

Come out and play baseball.

No baseball experience required. RSVP to join@columbuswbl.com

See you all there!

Columbus Women’s Baseball League

Little League International, Inc., World Series 2009: 13-year-old girl powers Canada – August 26, 2009 – espn.com

13-year-old girl powers Canada – August 26, 2009 – espn.com <- click to view video and for the rest of the story…

The announcer states, “it is the first girl to get a hit in the World Series in 5 years…” – yeah, if more girls were encouraged to play, it would probably happen more often…

SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. — Score one for girls at the Little League World Series.

Katie Reyes’ two-run single in the top of the sixth helped Vancouver, British Columbia, rally for a wild 14-13 victory Tuesday over Ramstein Air Force Base, Germany.

Little League president Stephen Keener and other longtime tournament officials said they could not recall a girl getting the game-winning hit before in a World Series game.

“I was excited. I was shaking,” the quiet, 13-year-old girl said about going to the plate for her big hit. She finished with three hits and three RBIs…

“The time has come for one and all to play ball!”- A League of Their Own – By Jena Donlin and Lindsay Hock – August 26, 2009 – womenssportsfoundation.org

“The time has come for one and all to play ball!”- A League of Their Own – By Jena Donlin and Lindsay Hock – August 26, 2009 – womenssportsfoundation.org

The Women’s Sports Foundation catches up with Mary Jo Stegeman, the founder of the Chicago Pioneers, about baseball, softball and her thoughts on the future of baseball for girls…

…Mary Jo Stegeman, the founder of the all-girls baseball team — the Chicago Pioneers — and mother of a member of the first two national women’s baseball teams in the United States, has been looking for this answer for years. We sat down with Mary Jo to talk baseball, softball and her thoughts on the future of baseball for girls…

WSF: How did you get involved in women’s baseball and the Chicago Pioneers?

MJS: I am the founder and everything else, besides coach, for the Chicago Pioneers. I was the eldest of seven girls growing up, and there was nothing for us sports-wise. We were all athletic but weren’t athletes because there weren’t opportunities. We loved sports and always felt left out of little leagues, but since we didn’t have a brother we didn’t really realize what we were missing.

When my husband and I had a baseball girl, it was an eye-opening, mind-boggling experience. She is 25 years old and still playing baseball. When we went to sign her up as a kid, we were directed to softball because the league directors didn’t know what to do with her. At her first game, it was like “Oh no, we got the girl.” They put her at the end of the line up. She got up to the plate with bases loaded and hit a grand slam. She became one of the better players in the league and was chosen for the All Star and travel teams…

GPB Editor’s note: in the interview, it is incorrectly stated that the Chicago Pioneers 12U division team is the first all-girl team to play in Cooperstown Dreams Park (CDP). Actually, the BaseballForAll / Women’s Baseball league, inc., Sparks have been playing at CDP since 2003, and each year since. However, the claim of being the first US team is accurate: the BFL/WBL Sparks has included girls from around the world, but mainly, both USA and Canada.

Katie Reyes becomes first girl game winner at Little League WS – By ‘Duk – Wed Aug 26, 2009 – sports.yahoo.com

Katie Reyes becomes first girl game winner at Little League WS –
By ‘Duk – Wed Aug 26, 2009 – sports.yahoo.com

For those folks who didn’t know that girls can play in the Little League World Series, here’s another revelation that might come as bit of a shock.

The ladies can win games for their teams, too.

From Girls of Little League International, Inc.

In what tournament organizers said was most likely a LLWS first, Katie Reyes hit a game-winning two-RBI single in Canada’s 14-13 win over Germany on Tuesday afternoon in Williamsport, Pa.

From Girls of Little League International, Inc.

Fifteen girls have played in the LLWS since 1984, but apparently none had logged the game’s top highlight until Reyes had three hits and three RBIs on Tuesday. She also caught the game’s final out at first base…

Reyes, Stonehouse breaking barriers – By Will Gonzalez – ESPN.com: Little League World Series 2009 – Monday, August 24, 2009

Reyes, Stonehouse breaking barriers – By Will Gonzalez – ESPN.com: Little League World Series 2009 – Monday, August 24, 2009

SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. — Two young ladies are doing their part to mark the 25th anniversary of the breaking of the gender barrier in Little League Baseball.

Katie Reyes and Bryn Stonehouse are only the second pair of girls to play in the same Little League World Series in the 63-year history of the tournament.

Reyes plays first base and the outfield for team Canada.

From Teams of Little League International, Inc. World Series 2009

Stonehouse plays first, third, and the outfield for Saudi Arabia.

From Teams of Little League International, Inc. World Series 2009

They join a small but expanding group of 15 girls who have participated in the annual tournament of 12 and 13 year old baseball players which takes place in Williamsport, a town in the heart of north central Pennsylvania nestled next to the banks of the Susquehanna River at the foothills of the Allegheny Mountains.

Although 13 girls have played in the Little League World Series since 1984 when Victoria Roche, a member of the Belgium Little League team, became the first girl to break the tournament’s gender barrier, no girl had played in the Little League World Series since 2004 when Alexandra Bellini of Ottawa, Canada, and Meghan Sims of Owensboro, Kentucky, became the first pair of girls to play in the same year in Williamsport.

Stonehouse is very cognizant of what it means for a girl to play in the tournament. “I feel like I am carrying on that history,” said the 13 year old who is also very happy to “go out and eat food that you don’t get to eat when you are in Saudi Arabia.” Stonehouse was born in Katy, Texas. Her family moved to Saudi Arabia four years ago.

From Girls of Little League International, Inc.

Reyes is aware of the historical significance of what it means for her to be in Williamsport, but she loves to play baseball so much that breaking the gender barrier is secondary. “I just want to play baseball. It is a lot of fun. I like it every part of the game.”

From Girls of Little League International, Inc.

She admits, however, that her parents are more excited about her trailblazing than she is. “They are speechless.” Reyes’ parents, Hercules and Rachel Reyes, are Phillipino immigrants who moved to Vancouver, Canada before Katie was born. Katie’s’ love for the game sprouted when her 11 year old brother Matthew started playing in a local league. “I just wanted to help…

Canadian ‘girl that delivers’ takes on the World Series – by Matthew Sekeres – VANCOUVER — From Saturday’s Globe and Mail – Last updated on Monday, Aug. 24, 2009 03:03AM EDT

Canadian ‘girl that delivers’ takes on the World Series – by Matthew Sekeres – VANCOUVER — From Saturday’s Globe and Mail – Last updated on Monday, Aug. 24, 2009 03:03AM EDT

This morning at a ballpark in northern Pennsylvania, east Vancouver’s Katie Reyes will revel in a rare field of dreams as she takes on the boys in the Little League World Series.

From Girls of Little League International, Inc.


Katie Reyes listens as baseball Hall of Famer Jim Rice talks about hitting and sportsmanship Friday, August 21, 2009 in Williamsport, Pa. Reyes plays first base and center field for Hastings Community Little League representing Canada in the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa. AP

Katie is one of just 15 girls in history to advance to the global baseball showcase for players 11 to 13 years old. Both Katie, as a girl in a game dominated by young boys of summer, and her Canadian championship team are decided underdogs at the Williamsport, Pa., tournament…

Sports / Pro Basketball: Lisa Leslie, the Face of the W.N.B.A., Prepares for Life After Basketball – By BRIAN HEYMAN – nytimes.com

Sports / Pro Basketball: Lisa Leslie, the Face of the W.N.B.A., Prepares for Life After Basketball – By BRIAN HEYMAN – nytimes.com

Lisa Leslie, one of the W.N.B.A.’s original players in 1997, will retire at the age of 37 as the league’s career leader in scoring and rebounding, and as one of its most recognizable pioneers.

Full Story:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/23/sports/basketball/23leslie.html?emc=tnt&tntemail1=y

NYTimes.com
620 Eighth Ave.
New York, N.Y. 10018

Copyright 2009 | The New York Times Company

“Why Women’s Rights Are the Cause of Our Time” – The New York Times Magazine – Sunday, August 23, 2009 – nytimes.com

“Why Women’s Rights Are the Cause of Our Time” – The New York Times Magazine – Sunday, August 23, 2005 – nytimes.com

Magazine: Organizations Supporting Women in Developing Countries

By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF and SHERYL WUDUNN
A list of some of the groups that specialize in supporting
women in developing countries.

Full Story:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/23/magazine/23women-list.html?emc=tnt&tntemail1=y

Magazine: A School Bus for Shamsia
By DEXTER FILKINS
A writer returned to Afghanistan to buy a bus for Afghan
girls who were attacked on their walk to school. But it
turns out giving isn’t always easy.

Full Story:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/23/magazine/23school-t.html?emc=tnt&tntemail1=y

Magazine: Editor’s Letter
By GERALD MARZORATI
Nicholas Kristof began writing his Times Op Ed column eight
years ago, and from the start, he has regularly and
incisively called attention to women’s issues, especially
those in the developing world. Traveling to scores of
countries, he has carefully documented and forcefully
denounced the crimes and cruelties suffered by women and
girls: sex trafficking and slavery; political rape; child
marriage; the denial of the freedom to pursue an education
or a career, or to enter a domestic relationship in which
you’re not beaten by a man. It’s the way life is lived too
much of the time in too many places by too many, though
this has for too long not been seen as “news.” Nick,
perhaps more than any other journalist working today, has
begun to change that.

Full Story:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/23/magazine/23edlet-t.html?emc=tnt&tntemail1=y

Magazine: A New Gender Agenda
INTERVIEW by MARK LANDLER
Hillary Rodham Clinton talks about the Obama
administration’s plans to push women’s rights issues on the
international stage.

Full Story:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/23/magazine/23clinton-t.html?emc=tnt&tntemail1=y

Magazine: The Women’s Crusade
By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF and SHERYL WuDUNN
The liberation of women could help solve many of the
world’s problems, from poverty to child mortality to
terrorism.

Full Story:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/23/magazine/23Women-t.html?emc=tnt&tntemail1=y

NYTimes.com
620 Eighth Ave.
New York, N.Y. 10018

Copyright 2009 | The New York Times Company

The Canadian National Exhibition (CNE) in partnership with the Central Ontario Girls Baseball League (COGBL) and Baseball Ontario will be hosting a “Pee Wee Girls Day in Baseball CNE Clinic”

The Canadian National Exhibition (CNE)
in partnership with the
Central Ontario Girls Baseball League (COGBL)
and Baseball Ontario will be hosting a


“Pee Wee Girls Day in Baseball CNE Clinic”

Date: Tuesday, September 1st
Time: 9 am to 12 noon
Where: Canadian National Exhibition (“The Ex”), Baseball Diamond
Cost: FREE!

A pee wee girls baseball clinic will be held at the CNE the morning of September 1st. The clinic will be run by members of the Midget Women Team Ontario and COGBL women players. All girls born 1996 or later are invited and encouraged to attend, whether they play baseball or not, regardless of skill level. Bring a friend. Bantam aged, come also. All are welcome!

Bonus 1 – all attendees will get a free CNE admissions pass courtesy of the CNE Pee Wee Baseball Committee.
Bonus 2 – Win one of several prizes (autographed bat, autographed
baseballs and baseball caps) donated by the Toronto Blue Jays!
Bonus 3 – Win a Girls Rally Cap donated by Baseball Canada and Baseball Ontario!

The baseball clinic will consist of enhancing basic fielding, hitting, and throwing skills. We will demonstrate the benefits of smart base running and safe sliding techniques. We will also emphasize the importance of a proper warm-up prior to game/practice time. Make sure to bring lots of water!

After the clinic and a short break for lunch we will create teams and play some baseball!

In order for the organizers to plan effectively, we ask that you pre-register using the form below.

REMEMBER – Bring lots of water and wear baseball or track pants.

For more information contact:
Vito Salemi: peewee@cogbl.com
CNE Pee Wee Baseball Committee – Girls Baseball
President and Pee Wee Convener, COGBL

Randy Low: women@cogbl.com
Women’s Divisions Convener and Outreach Committee Chair, COGBL

Important Links:
Canadian National Exhibition: theex.com
Baseball Ontario: baseballontario.com
Baseball Canada: baseball.ca

For Pee Wee Girls Day in Baseball CNE Clinic pre-registration click, here – and scroll to the bottom of the page.

Artist statement – Philomena Marano – “Girls Play to Win” is a tribute to the AAGPBL – georgekrevskygallery.com

Artist, Philomena Marano’s, response to inquiry on two pieces – “Girls Play to Win” – two pieces recently on display and currently available through private viewing by appointment – georgekrevskygallery.com

Hi Jim,

I’ve participated in the annual baseball exhibit at the George Krevsky Gallery for the past several years & this Spring, while thinking
about the game & it’s history I realized that there’s a piece that’s almost forgotten- the AAGPBL….

So, I decided to do a piece in homage to those courageous women. “Girls Play to Win” is about their achievment, it salutes the members of the AAGPBL plus it speaks to girls on how important it is to strive for something one wants to accomplish.

I can’t put it in better words than the famous line:
“I wanna be the one who walks in the sun,” (Cyndy Lauper-“Girls just wanna have fun.”)

-==-

Artist’s Statement: PHILOMENA MARANO:

Art of Baseball Exhibition 2009

Artist statement – “Girls Play to Win” is a tribute to the AAGPBL

My work often explores popular culture and its absorption into our lives.

Much of the time pop trends come and go while others, although short lived, sink deep into our psyche forming lasting impressions. Baseball, an institution of American recreation had an instance in history where something very different occurred. America’s involvement in the war resulted in a shortage of men and since we couldn’t live without our favorite sport, the girls stepped up to the plate…. thus the AAGPBL (All American Girls Professional Baseball League) was established.

In researching the league I discovered how the girls were required to attend charm school, to always wear lipstick in public and to wear their hair a bit longer.

The white ghostly cut out figures on my canvases (except for the red lips,) of Caroline Morris, pitcher for the Rockford Peaches and Anastasia Batikis, outfielder for the Racine Belles reflect the bravado of a league that played hard and then sadly vanished. Even though they played for a brief time in baseball history, the fiery spirit of the AAGPBL has had a positive impact on how girls participate more seriously in sports today… and that “Girls Play to Win.”

Links to the George Krevsky Gallery Exhibition, specifically to the two pieces, here:

PHILOMENA MARANO – Girls Play To Win #1 2009 – cut paper and painted canvas, 12 x 12 in.

PHILOMENA MARANO – Girls Play To Win #2 2009 – cut paper and painted canvas, 12 x 12 in.

The Problems of Youth Pitchers – Follow-up to Arms-Control Breakdown – nytimes.com

LETTERS

The Problems of Youth Pitchers – nytimes.com

Published: August 18, 2009

I read Ron Berler’s “Arms-Control Breakdown” with interest: my 14-year-old son has pitched since age 10. My husband and I have read about, researched and adhered to pitch counts and rest recommendations before they were even required — specifically Little League’s. How can you not trust Little League? And yet, my son’s left-shoulder growth plate has a hairline fracture. So what happened? Why didn’t the rest and pitch counts work? I wonder if any pitch count can be conservative enough when a kid’s bones are growing so quickly — and yet you don’t know a growth spurt is happening until it’s over. My son loves playing. Our goal, as parents, is to allow him to continue to have fun playing baseball. We don’t want the pros or a college scholarship for him — just fun. And the recommendations that are out there for youth baseball players are not working.

MICHELLE BUCKLEY
Houston

From Arms-Control Breakdown By RON BERLER – August 9, 2009 – nytimes.com

-==-

Follow-up to:
Arms-Control Breakdown – nytimes.com

Published: August 9, 2009

By RON BERLER

Most baseball pitchers pitch with pain. Alden Manning’s elbow pain began when he was 14, playing for his Greenville, N.C., middle-school baseball team in the spring of 2008. He would throw five or six innings and afterward, at Cubbie’s, a local burger joint, feel the inside of his right forearm near his elbow start to tighten. Back home, his dad, an orthodontist, would massage it with liniments and creams. The pain never worried Alden. He played baseball nearly year-round for four teams. That year, he “always had soreness,” he told me recently. “A lot of kids do.” After several days he would feel well enough to pitch again. But the ache never entirely went away.

The first time the pain really got to Alden was after an outing against E. B. Aycock, a powerhouse middle-school team in Greenville, just a mile and a half from his own school, C. M. Eppes. The schools had a fierce if lopsided baseball rivalry: Eppes hadn’t beaten Aycock in eight years. Alden, who would soon finish eighth grade and graduate, wanted badly to win. So did the Eppes coach, Danny Dally, whose career record against Aycock was 0-16. Ken Manning, Alden’s dad and perhaps the team’s biggest booster, felt the same way.

At Aycock that afternoon, Alden pitched six hard innings on a big-league-size diamond, throwing 80 to 90 pitches — near his limit, according to Dally. By then, Eppes held a 5-1 lead with three outs to go. Dally moved Alden to shortstop. Immediately, the relief pitcher ran into trouble, surrendering two runs, loading the bases and getting only one out. “In the stands,” Ken Manning told me, “we were all just suffering.” Manning climbed down the rickety aluminum bleachers behind third base and approached Dally. “It’s all right to put Alden back in and finish it up,” he said.

“You sure?” Dally asked.

“It’s fine,” Manning insisted…

From Arms-Control Breakdown By RON BERLER – August 9, 2009 – nytimes.com

Every tryout, every practice is a battle won…

I’m out at Marshbank Field, just outside of San Francisco, in Daly City, for a Baseball tryout. My daughter, Jessica, is out here like the rest of the boys. It is a High School-level tryout. As a Sophomore she is at the bottom edge of the age range the team is intended for. But, that means: she should be viewed as any other Sophomore present is treated.

I ran into, then followed up with, the lead of this team, Bob Bell, who has been coaching Baseball in San Francisco for over 15 years. The team, the Senators, is one of his Baseball ventures and community outreach programs.

I see boys down on the field from all of the High Schools within a 15 mile radius, most of whom heard of this practice word of mouth, of from their Spring coach. Jessica is one of 32 players out here, today.

Jessica’s high School coach, Gary Johnson, much like Bob Bell, has been a dedicated Baseball coach: for, at least, 12 years. I was pleasantly surprised and impressed with Jessica’s high School athletic director was able to secure Gary and two others, one a long-time player in Amateur Men’s Baseball; the other, a recent college graduate, who previously graduated from the same high school Jessica is currently enrolled in. Gary has been entirely supportive of Jessica.

Gary has been involved with a team of High School-level players, from a neighborhood known for our city’s Italian and Chinese legacies: North Beach. Gary has a reputation for building winning teams, year in, year out. After his first year coaching Jessica’s high school team, in the second year, the team will consist of 5 Sophomores including Jessica; 2 Juniors; one incoming transfer student Senior; and 4 Freshmen. Jessica paid her dues as a Freshman, so she becomes one of the senior members of her squad.

Today, Jessica is not the worst; she is not be best, player out here today. After one hour, there are now just 32 Baseball players on the field.

When I mentioned to Bob that Gary was Jessica’s High School Coach he was very positive and excited both for Gary and Jessica, knowing what a fine person, coach, Gary is, as a volunteer leader in his community.

From Practice Makes Perfect

During the Summer, Gary Johnson, and three other dedicated coaches, of high school-aged kids, assembled a “Junior Joe’s” league (named in contrast to our Joe DiMaggio Baseball League, which has, historically, filled its ranks with players of the same caliber as the Senators, the team Jessica is trying out with, today.

The “new” league was created by Mike Norris, retired Pitcher for the Oakland Athletics, a senior member of the San Francisco kids alma mater who grew up on our parks, but one of the infinitesimal who actually made it into the Big Leagues, from within a city that hosts one of the preeminent brands in the Major Leagues, the Giants.

Baseball in San Francisco, not unlike in many inner cities in the USA is in retreat. But, for some kids, it is their favorite game, such as for Jessica. Their desire, their passion, for this game, gets them from one tenuous event to another, some satisfying, others disappointing.

Today, was a very bright moment under the cold fog blanketing The City, the weather pattern is not unusual for Summertime in San Francisco and surrounding communities near to the Pacific Ocean. It actually makes for a rather perfect weather condition for a long, enduring practice or tryout as the players devoted themselves to, today.

There are hopeful examples, organizations both public and private, who offer the token of a Baseball Youth. Others are the first to prepare kids, in a systematic way, such as the University of San Francisco Junior Dons and the Treasure Island-located X-Level Pirates.

The Major League Baseball corporation, in conjunction with KPMG, a significant Accounting firm in the USA, has launched a terrific opportunity for any community to launch a new or revive an old league. It is through the RBI program (Reviving Baseball in the Inner-city) that committed citizens, such as Mike Norris and Gary Johnson, are tapping into the passion of our city’s inner youth.

I am not really concerned if Jessica is selected for this program. I certainly hope she will be and does receive extra consideration as a girl. I hope that she embraces this unique opportunity to represent girls within an even greater radius than 15 miles.

Here, today, the opportunity is mutual, for her, the coaches, the other players. As Bob confirmed in an email to me:

I DON’T REMEMBER A GIRL TRYING OUT OVER MY 15YRS MANAGING THE SENATORS.

Opportunities to play Baseball for any high school aged person, who actually practices, devotes him or herself, to the skill development unique to the game, are very limited in our area. Most kids are forced to embrace very expensive, proprietary Tournament teams and institutions, paying thousands of dollars per year just to sit on the bench.

Many programs are so competitive, a player can make the team for one tournament and sit the bench the very next one, for one error on the field or at the plate. Many parents become beside themselves when this happens.

The Senators is no less committed to excellence, but: understanding that these kids come from working-class families, where the resources simply don’t exist for their kids to play within Tournament organizations, the kids that turn out are treated with terrific deference.

Arriving at a place, any location, for even a few hours, where my daughter is accepted at a Baseball player, respected for all of her clear hard work leading up to this, is really all one can ask for and expect.

Yes, I have come to expect it.

Baseball Gloves for Young Girls by Josh Tuliano – August 17, 2009 – associatedcontent.com

Baseball Gloves for Young Girls by Josh Tuliano – August 17, 2009 – associatedcontent.com

Source: www.associatedcontent.com
Many girls are starting to get involved in the sport of baseball at a young age. Before you join a baseball league or even start practicing you need to find a good fitting glove that will make her enjoy the sport.

-==-

Looking for a Great Baseball Glove for a Young Girl Just Getting into the Sport?

Many girls are starting to get involved in the sport of baseball at a young age. Before she joins a baseball league or even start practicing you need to find a good fitting glove that will make her enjoy the sport. This article is going to take a look at 4 great baseball glove choices for young girls that are both affordable and have excellent. performance.

1. MacGregor Girls Baseball Glove

The MacGregor girls’ youth baseball glove is a perfect starter glove for a young girl getting into the sport of baseball. The glove is made from a synthetic leather material that allows it to be both durable and easy to break in. Fortunately the glove is designed to be used on both right and left hands, which is perfect for a young girl who does not know which hand she will use for baseball. This particular young girls’ baseball glove can be found at http://www.webclicshoppingmall.com for $29.95.

2. Cat Osterman 10″ Fastpitch Girls Glove

The Cat Osterman 10″ Fastpitch glove is a great starter glove for the younger years when girls start to play softball with a live pitch. The difference of course is the distance and speed the ball will travel with live pitch vs. a tee. The glove is designed for all positions and well reinforced to absorb the majority of the impact of the ball. This glove is designed for a younger player and allows for a wider net for ball catching. This glove can be found at http://baseball.epicsports.com for $18.99.

3. Rawlings Player Series PL109P 9″ Girls T-Ball Glove

Every young baseball player needs to start out somewhere and that will most likely start with t-ball. This particular glove is designed for the younger player who needs a small glove; it has the ability to catch balls about 9″ and is the perfect size for young hands. This glove should be used for players who are just starting out and not for fast pitch or later years. This great baseball glove for a young girl can be found at http://www.weplaysports.com for $10.99.

4. Franklin PVC 10.5″ Girls Pink Baseball Fielding Glove

This sporty glove caters to a fashionable young girl who wants a great fielding glove at a reasonable price. The full size web is perfect for fielding and easy throwing; however it should be noted this glove is for right handed girls (throws with left hand). The glove is durable enough for a great starter glove for a young girl just getting into baseball or in the first few years. This glove can be found at http://www.sportsunlimitedinc.com for $9.99.

“As you know, last Thursday we received the disappointing news that the IOC Executive Committee had chosen not to put forward baseball as one of the two sports for a general vote for the 2016 Olympics….” – Message from Dr. Harvey W. Schiller, IBAF – August 17, 2009 – ibaf.org – Posted on Facebook Group International Baseball Federation (IBAF) – Bring Back Baseball in 2016!

Subject: Message from Dr. Harvey W. Schiller, IBAF

Harvey Schiller, President IBAF - 2007-2009

August 17, 2009

Dear Colleague,

As you know, last Thursday we received the disappointing news that the IOC Executive Committee had chosen not to put forward baseball as one of the two sports for a general vote for the 2016 Olympics. Although the announcement was not what we had hoped for, it certainly does not detract from the great progress the sport of baseball is making globally, nor does it minimize the great collective effort by all involved to present the best possible case for baseball’s re-instatement for the Olympics. The fact remains, now more than ever, that baseball is a vibrant, growing sport played and enjoyed by millions and is reflective of all the Olympics are supposed to stand for, whether included in the programme or not.

First, we owe a word of thanks to all those who went above and beyond to assist us in the process leading into Thursday. That includes all the Federations, who not only enlisted the help of their IOC members but who also rallied so much local support for us on our Facebook and website efforts, along with the many people who wrote letters to key IOC members, ranging from college coaches and administrators to government and sport officials from around the world. The support we received was unprecedented and we are confident in the long run that it will benefit the growth of baseball, so long as we keep the momentum going. We would also be remiss in not acknowledging and thanking those at the highest level of the sport, Major League Baseball and the NPB, for all their assistance as well. The game would be nowhere without their efforts, and the support of Commissioner Selig, President Dupuy and Players Association Executive Director Fehr, as well as all the MLB owners and staff, is greatly appreciated. Lastly, there are our staff and Executive Committee, who also did everything possible until the final minutes to rally support. Thank you all for your efforts, they did not go unnoticed.

With regard to “what went wrong” in the Olympic process, it is probably not healthy or productive to spend much time looking back. We effectively addressed all the questions the IOC had with regard to reinstatement. We had unprecedented support from Major League Baseball, the Players Association and the Japanese League with regard to scheduling concessions and player availability, and even submitted a list of statements from top players to the IOC in the last week with regard to player commitment. The one thing MLB could not do was stop the season for the 2016 Olympics, especially without knowing which city was being selected as host. It is not a concession asked of soccer or tennis or other sports, and we did everything possible to provide the best alternative plan that would include using top players for the five day tournament. It is important to note that NOT ONE professional or top amateur player, when asked, said he would not participate in 2016 if his country qualified and he was selected. Not one.

We were also disappointed to see, even with all the concessions made, that a number of members of the IOC Executive Committee who said they would support baseball chose not to support the sport when the vote was taken. Of the countries where we thought we would have had 100% support we never received more than two votes per round, meaning for some reason unknown to us, even those countries where the sport is strong, officials still didn’t think that baseball should be part of the Olympic programme, despite all that we had done. It was clear from the start of the process that several senior IOC officials were in favor of rugby and golf and many comments made on and off the record supported that fact, so perhaps that is why we did not get the votes we were anticipating and had been promised last week.

Many have also asked about re-submitting a bid for 2020. At this point we do not think that would be prudent for a number of reasons, the biggest of which is that baseball has now been rejected twice by the senior members of the IOC, which is a clear message that despite any changes we make, we are not part of their plan. Also contrary to what we were originally told, the two sports that made it to the vote in Copenhagen, golf and rugby, have been informed they will be part of the programme in 2020. This was yet another clear message that the IOC has no interest in baseball. It makes much more sense to spend all our time, money and effort in continued development of the game around the world, as opposed to making futile attempts to work with a group that has no interest in partnering with baseball.

That being said, baseball is a sport that is full of infinite possibilities and resilience. Therefore, it is best that we look forward to what can be a very bright future.

In just this coming month, we will continue to see championship play on many levels, from youth championships like Little League and Pony League to the much-anticipated World Cup, as well as the World Series and the Japanese Championship later in the fall. The announcement of professional baseball returning to Australia and Israel, along with the continued growth and promotion of baseball in Italy and the Netherlands at a top level will continue to give us a growing presence in Europe, and we are very encouraged by development in emerging nations like Ghana, Nigeria, Pakistan, India, South Africa, Sri Lanka and China among many others. The plans to continue to expand the World Baseball Classic are also ongoing, and there remains strong interest from several sites to host the 2010 Women’s World Cup and continue to develop baseball for girls and young women. All of that is very positive and shows us that we are very much on the right track in growing the game with our partners.

Do we have challenges? Yes. We are aware that some Federations may lose some funding as a result of not being on the Olympic programme, and we remain concerned about the split that softball continues to push with federations in several countries. However we feel that by working together and using economies of scale, identifying new partners and showing what a great social unifier the sport can be, all these problems can be overcome. Baseball after all, is perhaps the sport that teaches teamwork and overcoming adversity better than any other. That is what helps make it such a great game.

In closing I want to personally thank you for your support of our efforts in my two years as President. I am very proud of not just the effort we made, but the way we made the effort. We did not waste money on high priced teams of consultants or advertising campaigns that were proved by other sports to be pointless and a distraction from the mission of growing the sport. Instead we concentrated on telling the stories, building consensus, aligning long term support and exposing the game to as wide an audience as possible, and those efforts, with or without the Olympics, have created a much more solid base for year round effective growth of baseball than ever existed before.

As always, any comments, questions or thoughts are welcomed. I hope to see you soon.

Best regards,

Dr. Harvey W. Schiller
President
International Baseball Federation

Editorial: Stalemate – AND Meltdown?!? Baseball and Softball are not going to appear in the 2016 International Olympics – in case you haven’t heard the news, yet…

Baseball and Softball are not going to appear in the 2016 International Olympics – in case you haven’t heard the news, yet. This is huge – everyone in girls and women’s baseball has been waiting for the announcement of the two sports that were to be recommended for the 2016 IO as additions to the existing sports.

What we have been waiting for is official validation of girls and women who prefer baseball to softball. Unfortunately, the IOC position, prior to today was: we won’t pick both sports, but only one of them, while recommending yet an entirely different sport: rather than pick both as the two to be reinstated since the 2008 Olympics. 2012 is a wash since it was for the next IO that Baseball and Softball had been scratched.

Even if Baseball and Softball had joined forces, Men’s Baseball + Women’s Softball, a logical compromise if there ever was one, when they had the chance, it would not have addressed the core issue that we, the supporters of girls and women in Baseball face: support, both financial and cultural, societal, support, or the entire lack of it!

If the International Olympic Committee is not going to support girls developing into women who are legitimate candidates, worldwide, for their respective national teams, then who is?

The logical candidate for this support is Major League Baseball, International, Inc.

One could argue that the International Baseball Federations (IBAF) IS the arm of the MLB that can and does (what it can, with what I understand to be a rather limited budget, for all IBAF programs, worldwide.) But, if they are not funded, enough, then no: the IBAF does not serve that function, in any way proportional to the support boys and men receive, worldwide.

Let us step back: “What do you mean, ‘the IBAF is an arm of MLB?” you may be asking…

Let’s assume the the IBAF is not funded by the MLB or that USA Baseball is not funded, either. But, if the World Baseball Classic, the International Olympics rely on existing MLB Pro players (including those who end up playing for their respective home countries), then MLB funds all these efforts, and for good, financial reasons. I’m not going to Google the numbers, but: the millions of eyeballs that were plastered to their TV screens, the amount of money sponsors paid to be plastered all over the player’s uniforms – let alone the investment in TV commercials, played for discrete audiences, for discrete industries and markets: MLB, and its members, the franchises, (no doubt, the international farm and minor league systems, in the respective countries) clearly earned the lion share of the money.

Even during the worst economic downturn in human history, which supposedly has a light at the end of the tunnel: millions of fans are paying millions of dollars to MLB to support the entertainment franchise.

-==-

Australia recently announced a partnership between the Australian Baseball Federation and Major League Baseball. Together, they will build an entirely new Australian National Baseball League.

You may recall, if you watched the last World Baseball Classic that Australia brought a very competitive team. They clearly were ready to play; but, they seem to play a slightly different flavor – in my opinion. Not inferior just different: side-by-side, their players were trimmer, not bulky, like the players from any of the USA MLB franchises (I watched on TV, a number of pre-WBC games, between the Australia team and MBL Spring Training squads.) But the Australians were determined to play and potentially win.

There are a number of Australian men playing Baseball in the USA, in the minors and the Majors. I have not doubt the intention of the MLB is not simply, out of the goodness in their hearts, to help Australia achieve parity in the World of Baseball, literally and figuratively.

No doubt, MLB sees three distinct opportunities:

– build a profitable Australian entertainment industry, for their domestic consumption;

– build an even more successful and compatible farm system;

– prepare Australia to play at the level of the USA to contend with other growing Baseball markets, worldwide. Their presence in the Pacific Rim is neither a coincidence but is rather a huge asset: if they can build as successful a franchise as the MLB intends.

-==-

Australia continues to be the most enigmatic example to look at the future of girls and women in Baseball. Canada seems to have actually stepped up in a way unlike any other country in supporting girls and women in Baseball. I could be entirely swayed by the information I glean from the Internet; from conversations from players, their families, their supporters in Canada, but: it seems as if they have the most substantial reserve of girls and women playing Baseball on the planet. Again I could be misreading this, but: despite the amazing support girls and women receive in Japan, China, South Korea and Chinese Taipei (and Hong Kong): the sport appears to be most mainstreamed in Canada.

The recent showing by Canada, at an International Baseball tournament, in July 2009, both as host of the event as well as providing an ample number of players ready to compete, is a salient example.

However, all is not perfect in Canada, as girls had been faced, in the past year, with having to choose between playing Single-sex (girls) or Coed, at the sanctioned, Youth Baseball levels (i.e., Peewee, Bantam, etc.) That decision has been rescinded and now girls are not faced with the choice that inevitably leads to a less competitive girl Baseball player. Yes, I am insinuating that girls who play Baseball with Boys become more competitive than if they only play with girls.

I would like others to chime in on this point: either in challenging the claim, in general; provide examples of equally-competitive girls programs, where the girls could stack up against the boys, on parity; or, the more attractive option:

WHY DOESN’T THE WORLD ACCEPT THAT GIRLS SHOULD BE PLAYING BASEBALL TOGETHER IN THEIR OWN LEAGUES IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES AND PLAY EACH OTHER AS BOYS DO?

-==- to be continued -=-

-==-

Disclaimer: I have no insider information; I have not had one conversation with any officer of any franchise or any public relations representative. This is entirely speculation, based on my own observations, interpretation of what I read in the mainstream press, and conversations with girls and women who prefer Baseball to Softball – and those who enjoy playing both sports, thank you very much…

Billy Jean King receives United States of America’s highest civilian honor – whitehouse.gov

Revised:

Billie Jean King receives nation’s highest civilian honor

American sports icon Billie Jean King received the Presidential Medal of Freedom on Wednesday during a White House ceremony.

The honor is the nation’s highest civilian honor.

In announcing this year’s 16 recipients, President Obama said that the honorees were diverse.

“Yet, they share one overarching trait — each has been an agent of change,” he said. “Each saw an imperfect world and set about improving it, often overcoming great obstacles along the way.

“They have blazed trails and broken down barriers.”

King is best known for her victory over Bobby Riggs in the “Battle of the Sexes” tennis match in 1973. In addition to winning 39 Grand Slam titles during her career, she also founded the Women’s Tennis Association and World TeamTennis.

Her impact on sports, though, goes far beyond tennis. She founded the Women’s Sports Foundation and Women’s Sports Magazine. She is a champion for gender equality not only in sports but also in all areas of society.

King donated a scholarship to AWSM last year in memory of her mother. The inaugural Betty Jean Moffitt Scholarship was awarded this summer.

“Every woman in sports media owes a debt of gratitude to Billie Jean,” AWSM president Jenni Carlson said. “She proved that women deserved a place in sports. She blazed the trail that all of us have followed.

“Receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom celebrates Billie Jean’s contributions to our society, and we offer our congratulations for this latest honor.”

***

For more information, contact Jenni Carlson at president@awsmonline.org.

-==-

Billy Jean King receives nation’s highest civilian honor

American sports icon Billy Jean King received the Presidential Medal of Freedom on Wednesday during a White House ceremony.

The honor is the nation’s highest civilian honor.

In announcing this year’s 16 recipients, President Obama said that the honorees were diverse.

“Yet, they share one overarching trait — each has been an agent of change,” he said. “Each saw an imperfect world and set about improving it, often overcoming great obstacles along the way.

“They have blazed trails and broken down barriers.”

King is best known for her victory over Bobby Riggs in the “Battle of the Sexes” tennis match in 1973. In addition to winning 39 Grand Slam titles during her career, she also founded the Women’s Tennis Association and World TeamTennis.

Her impact on sports, though, goes far beyond tennis. She founded the Women’s Sports Foundation and Women’s Sports Magazine. She is a champion for gender equality not only in sports but also in all areas of society.

King donoted a scholarship to AWSM last year in memory of her mother. The inaugural Betty Jean Moffitt Scholarship was awarded this summer.

“Every woman in sports media owes a debt of gratitude to Billy Jean,” AWSM president Jenni Carlson said. “She proved that women deserved a place in sports. She blazed the trail that all of us have followed.

“Receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom celebrates Billy Jean’s contributions to our society, and we offer our congratulations for this latest honor.”

For more information, contact Jenni Carlson at president@awsmonline.org.

-==-

From the White House Press Release web site:

THE WHITE HOUSE

Office of the Press Secretary
___________________________________________________________________________
For Immediate Release August 12, 2009

MEDAL OF FREEDOM CEREMONY

EAST ROOM

3:00PM EDT

President Obama will award 16 individuals the 2009 Presidential Medal of Freedom. The President will deliver welcoming remarks and then present the medals to the following individuals:

Nancy Goodman Brinker
Pedro Jose Greer, Jr.
Joanne Kemp, accepting award on behalf of her deceased husband, Jack Kemp
Kara Kennedy, accepting award on behalf of her father, Senator Edward M. Kennedy
Billie Jean King
Reverend Joseph Lowery
Joe Medicine Crow – High Bird
Stuart Milk, accepting award on behalf of his deceased uncle, Harvey Milk
Sandra Day O’Connor
Sidney Poitier
Chita Rivera
Mary Robinson
Janet Davison Rowley
Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu
Muhammad Yunus
Stephen Hawking
Below are the 2009 Presidential Medal of Freedom Citations, which will be read at the ceremony this afternoon:

Drawing strength from tragedy, Nancy Goodman Brinker has transformed the Nation’s approach to breast cancer. When her sister was diagnosed in 1977, most breast cancer victims knew relatively little about the disease and suffered from popular stigmas. Nancy G. Brinker promised to challenge these norms. She founded Susan G. Komen for the Cure in honor of her sister, and today, the organization supports research and community awareness programs across the United States and around the world. Nancy G. Brinker’s unique passion and determination have been a blessing to all those whose lives have been touched by breast cancer.

Dr. Pedro José “Joe” Greer, Jr. has devoted his career to improving medical services for the uninsured. A native of Miami, he followed his passion for helping others to medical school and founded the Camillus Health Concern (CHC) in 1984 as a medical intern. Today, CHC treats thousands of homeless patients a year, serving as a model clinic for the poor and inspiring physicians everywhere to work with indigent populations. Dr. Greer’s tremendous contributions to the South Florida community and our Nation as a whole stand as a shining example of the difference one person can make in the lives of many.

Persistent in his pursuit of knowledge, Stephen Hawking has unlocked new pathways of discovery and inspired people around the world. He has dedicated his life to exploring the fundamental laws that govern the universe, and he has contributed to some of the greatest scientific discoveries of our time. His work has stirred the imagination of experts and lay persons alike. Living with a disability and possessing an uncommon ease of spirit, Stephen Hawking’s attitude and achievements inspire hope, intellectual curiosity, and respect for the tremendous power of science.

A statesman and a sports icon, Jack French Kemp advocated for his beliefs with an unwavering integrity and intellectual honesty. On the football field, he earned the respect and admiration of his teammates for his judgment and leadership. As a public servant, he placed country before party, and ideas before ideology. Jack Kemp saw bridges where others saw divisions, and his legacy serves as a shining example for all who strive to challenge conventional wisdom, stay true to themselves, and better our Nation.

For more than four decades, Senator Edward M. Kennedy has boldly fought for equal opportunity, fairness, and justice for all Americans. In his tireless quest for a more perfect Union, Senator Kennedy has reformed our schools, strengthened our civil rights, helped seniors and working families, lifted up the poor, and worked to ensure that every American has access to quality and affordable health care. With volumes of laws bearing his name and countless lives touched by his extraordinary passion, Senator Kennedy has accumulated several lifetimes’ worth of achievements. The United States proudly recognizes this righteous citizen, devout public servant, and giant among men.

Through her example and advocacy, Billie Jean Moffitt King has advanced the struggle for greater gender equality around the world. In an age of male-dominated sports, her pioneering journey took her from Long Beach, California, to the lawns of the All England Club and the International Tennis Hall of Fame. Her athletic acumen is matched only by her unwavering defense of equal rights. With Billie Jean King pushing us, the road ahead will be smoother for women, the future will be brighter for LGBT Americans, and our Nation’s commitment to equality will be stronger for all.

Reverend Joseph E. Lowery has marched through life with faith and purpose, carrying with him the legacy of a movement that touched America’s conscience and changed its history. At the forefront of the major civil rights events of our time—from the Montgomery bus boycott to protests against apartheid—he has served as a tireless beacon for nonviolence and social justice. As a pastor and civil rights advocate, he co-founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and championed the cause of peace and freedom around the world. The United States proudly honors this outstanding leader.

As a warrior and living legend, history flows through Dr. Joseph Medicine Crow – High Bird. Born on a reservation and raised by traditional grandparents, he became the first member of his tribe to earn a master’s degree. For his valiant service in World War II, he was awarded the status of Crow War Chief, and his renowned studies of the First Americans and contributions to cultural and historical preservation have been critical to our understanding of America’s history. Joe Medicine Crow is a symbol of strength and survival, and the United States honors him for his dedication to this country and to all Native Americans.

Harvey Bernard Milk dedicated his life to shattering boundaries and challenging assumptions. As one of the first openly gay elected officials in this country, he changed the landscape of opportunity for the Nation’s gay community. Throughout his life, he fought discrimination with visionary courage and conviction. Before his tragic death in 1978, he wisely noted, “Hope will never be silent,” and called upon Americans to stay true to the guiding principles of equality and justice for all. Harvey Milk’s voice will forever echo in the hearts of all those who carry forward his timeless message.

Sandra Day O’Connor has paved the way for millions of women to achieve their dreams. Completing law school in just two years, she graduated third in her class at a time when women rarely entered the legal profession. With grace and humor, tenacity and intelligence, she rose to become the first woman on the United States Supreme Court. Her historic 25-Term tenure on the Court was defined by her integrity and independence, and she has earned the Nation’s lasting gratitude for her invaluable contributions to history and the law.

Ambassador and actor, Sidney Poitier has left an indelible mark on American culture. Rising from the tomato farms of the Bahamas, his talent led him to Broadway, Hollywood, and global acclaim. In front of black and white audiences struggling to right the Nation’s moral compass, Sidney Poitier brought us the common tragedy of racism, the inspiring possibility of reconciliation, and the simple joys of everyday life. Ultimately, the man would mirror the character, and both would advance the Nation’s dialogue on race and respect.

From stage to screen, Chita Rivera has captured America’s imagination with her magnetic presence and radiant voice. Over a career that has spanned a half-century, she has received numerous accolades for her performances, including two Tony Awards, six additional Tony nominations, and the Kennedy Center Honors Award. As fearless as “Anita” in West Side Story, and as self-reliant as “Aurora” in Kiss of the Spider Woman, she has broken barriers under Broadway’s lights and inspired a generation of women to follow in her remarkable footsteps. The United States honors Chita Rivera for her lifetime of achievement as one of America’s great artists.

For Mary Robinson, the fight to end discrimination and suffering is an urgent moral imperative. She has been a trail-blazing crusader for women’s rights in Ireland and a forceful advocate for equality and human rights around the world. Whether courageously visiting conflict-stricken regions, or working to inject concern for human rights into business and economic development, Mary Robinson continues this important work today, urging citizens and nations to make common cause for justice.

Dr. Janet Davison Rowley was the first scientist to identify a chromosomal translocation as the cause of leukemia and other cancers – considered among the most important medical breakthroughs of the past century. After enrolling at the University of Chicago at age 15, she went on to challenge the conventional medical wisdom about the cause of cancer in the 1970s, which had placed little emphasis on chromosomal abnormalities. Her work has proven enormously influential to researchers worldwide who have used her discovery to identify genes that cause fatal cancers and to develop targeted therapies that have revolutionized cancer care. The United States honors this distinguished scientist for advancing genetic research and the understanding of our most devastating diseases.

With unflagging devotion to justice, indomitable optimism, and an unmistakable sense of humor, Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Mpilo Tutu has stirred the world’s conscience for decades. As a man of the cloth, he has drawn the respect and admiration of a diverse congregation. He helped lead South Africa through a turning point in modern history, and with an unshakable humility and firm commitment to our common humanity, he helped heal wounds and lay the foundation for a new nation. Desmond Tutu continues to give voice to the voiceless and bring hope to those who thirst for freedom.

With his belief in the self-reliance of all people, Professor Muhammad Yunus has altered the face of finance and entrepreneurship. As an academic, he struggled with pervading economic theories and their effects on the people of his native Bangladesh. Yearning for a new way of lifting people out of poverty, he revolutionized banking to allow low-income borrowers access to credit. In the process, he has enabled citizens of the world’s poorest countries to create profitable businesses, support their families, and help build sustainable communities. In so doing, Muhammad Yunus has unleashed new avenues of creativity and inspired millions worldwide to imagine their own potential.

IOC EXECUTIVE BOARD PROPOSES 2 ADDITIONAL SPORTS FOR THE 2016 GAMES: GOLF AND RUGBY – [NOT BASEBALL NOR SOFTBALL] – 13 August 2009 – olympic.org

IOC EXECUTIVE BOARD PROPOSES 2 ADDITIONAL SPORTS FOR THE 2016 GAMES: GOLF AND RUGBY- [NOT BASEBALL NOR SOFTBALL]

13 August 2009

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) Executive Board (EB) proposed today the list of 26 core sports and 2 additional sports, golf and rugby, to be included in the 2016 Olympic Programme. The proposal will be submitted to the full IOC for a final decision at its Session in Copenhagen in October, where golf and rugby will have the opportunity to present. Seven sports — baseball, golf, karate, roller sports, rugby, softball and squash — were seeking to enter the Olympic programme. The secret ballot vote by the EB followed an extensive evaluation by the Olympic Programme Commission of the potential added value to the Games from each of the seven sports.

“All seven sports made a strong case for inclusion, and the EB carefully evaluated them in a transparent and fair process. In the end, the decision came down to which two would add the most value,” said IOC President Jacques Rogge, who elected not to take part in the vote. “Golf and rugby will be a great addition to the Games.”

The key factors in determining a sport’s suitability for the Olympic programme include youth appeal, universality, popularity, good governance, respect for athletes and respect for the Olympic values.

“Golf and rugby scored high on all the criteria,” Rogge said. “They have global appeal, a geographically diverse line-up of top iconic athletes and an ethic that stresses fair play.”

During the 119th Session in Guatemala in 2007, the IOC approved a simplified voting process for new sport to enter the programme. The IOC members also requested guidance from the EB in the selection of the new sports, and entrusted it to make a proposal based on the work of the Olympic Programme Commission.

All seven sports had a chance to make their case to the Olympic Programme Commission in November 2008 and to the IOC EB in June 2009. Federations were also able to review their section of the report submitted to the EB.

Election results

Additional information:

All changes to the sports programme for 2016 are provisional and will be reviewed after the 2016 Games.

Format of the golf competition for the Games proposed by the International Golf Federation (IGF): 8-day competition (4 for men and 4 for women) with 60 men and 60 women. Both men and women play 72 holes of stroke play, 18 holes per day. Medals would be awarded to the 3 competitors with the lowest total score. For more information: www.internationalgolffederation.org

Format of the rugby competition for the Games proposed by the International Rugby Board (IRB): 2 to 4 days of competition of rugby sevens. Teams would be split into 2 pools of 6 with a total of 12 men’s teams and 12 women’s teams (288 athletes). The 2 top teams in each pool would qualify for semi-finals. For more information: www.irb.com

PHOTOS:

When available, images will be published to flickr.com, click here.

VIDEOS:

The press conference with President Jacques Rogge will be available shortly on www.olympic.org

For more information please contact the IOC Communications Department,
Tel: +41 21 621 60 00, email: pressoffice@olympic.org

Katie Bilan – Female TC alum to play in Japan – Raleigh’s Katie Bilan to compete in WCBF in Tokyo – By Rica Bilan – July 17, 2009 – usabaseball.com

Female TC alum to play in Japan – Raleigh’s Katie Bilan to compete in WCBF in Tokyo – By Rica Bilan – July 17, 2009 – usabaseball.com

Katie Bilan of Raleigh, North Carolina was selected to play for the North American All-Star Girls Baseball Team “Shooting Stars” in the World Children’s Baseball Fair (WCBF) Friendship Games in Tokyo, Japan on July 26-31, 2009.

This summer, Katie will be traveling to Japan with the Shooting Stars, a 12u team, who are the first All-Girl Baseball Team to compete in almost two decades of this annual international event.

From Shooting Stars – BaseballForAll

Katie was selected to play for the Shooting Stars because of her passionate love for the game of baseball and her desire to meet children from around the world. The Shooting Stars All-Girl Baseball Team is managed by Justine Siegal, who is the first woman to coach professional men’s baseball when she joined the 2009 staff of the Brockton Rox.

The WCBF was established under the leadership of World Home Run Kings Mr. Sadaharu Oh and Mr. Hank Aaron in order to foster an environment of world understanding and cultural exchange through the celebration of baseball. This year, WCBF is held in support of baseball’s return to the Olympic Games and Tokyo’s bid to host the Summer Olympic Games in 2016.

“The love for baseball is the common bond that brings these children together,” says Justine Siegal, head coach, and president of Baseball for All. “Soon they will have friends from around the world.” Teams attending this year’s event are from North America, Cameroon, Australia, Germany, Taiwan, and Japan. Baseball for All is an organization that provides meaningful instruction and opportunities for both girls and boys in baseball.

Katie Bilan, 12, is the daughter of Edgar and Rica Bilan of Raleigh, NC. Katie is the only girl in the Major League of the North Wake County Baseball Association (NWCBA). Her NWCBA Baseball Team, The White Sox, has just clinched the Championship in the Spring 2009 Season!

“I cannot wait to play in Japan and meet other children from around the world,” exclaims Katie who attended the Durham Bulls Pepsi Baseball Camp last year and was a Finalist in the Home Run Derby at the 1st Triangle Classic of USA Baseball in Cary.

Aside from baseball, Katie is also a Deputy Black Belt in Olympic-Style Taekwondo with World Champion Taekwondo and has Instructor Level 2 Qualifications. Katie is also a Division Champion in the Southern Oak Equestrian Center Horse Shows and sings with the Leesville Cubs Choir and St. Francis Children’s Choir. She has also designed the winning T-Shirt entry for Cisco Systems during the last Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) Freedom Walk. Aside from her extra-curricular activities, Katie is also part of the Duke Talent Identification Program (DUKE TIP) and is in the Academically Gifted (AG) Program at Leesville Road Middle School.

Katie will be missing her first week of Middle School as Leesville converts to a Year-Round Academic Calendar. Fortunately, Principal Patti Haimler has been very supportive of Katie and recognizes what a great opportunity this is for her.

For more information on Katie and the Shooting Stars, please contact Justine at 413-301-2748 or by email at justinebaseball@gmail.com. Team pictures can be found at the BaseBall For All’s website at http://www.baseballforall.com.

No fiddling around: violinist plays anthem on bat – August 8, 2009 – si.com

No fiddling around: violinist plays anthem on bat – August 8, 2009 – si.com

WASHINGTON (AP) -A violinist for the National Symphony Orchestra made his major league debut Saturday night, playing the national anthem on a baseball bat before the game between the Washington Nationals and Arizona Diamondbacks.
Glenn Donnellan used an electric violin that he hand-crafted from a regulation bat – Derek Jeter model – he bought at a local sporting goods store.
A dedicated musician and a baseball fan, the 39-year-old Donnellan was primed to put his two loves together.
“I went to the Sports Authority with my fiddle one day after work, held it up to the bat, and it looked about right,” Donnellan said…

-==-

To view YouTube video of Glenn performing on the electric violin bat click, here.