dorothy mills | Search Results | GIRLS PLAY BASEBALL

For girls who just / want to play Baseball
— Read on girlsplaybaseball.blog/

Dorothy Seymour Mills, baseball’s first female historian, dies in Tucson at 91 | Baseball | tucson.com

Mills had been living in Tucson for the last year.
— Read on tucson.com/content/tncms/live/

Dorothy Seymour Mills, who received belated credit for husband’s baseball books, dies at 91 – The Washington Post

Harold Seymour received praise for his books on baseball history but didn’t give his wife credit as a co-author. Only after his death was her full partnership as a researcher acknowledged.
— Read on www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/dorothy-seymour-mills-who-received-belated-credit-for-husbands-baseball-books-dies-at-91/2019/11/20/c6df24d4-0baf-11ea-8397-a955cd542d00_story.html

In Memoriam: Dorothy Seymour Mills | Society for American Baseball Research

In Memoriam: Dorothy Seymour Mills | Society for American Baseball Research
— Read on sabr.org/latest/memoriam-dorothy-seymour-mills

About The Sceptre – Dorothy Jane Mills

The Sceptre gives us the adventures of Katya Becker, an Austrian immigrant to Cleveland, who returns to her homeland to research the meaning of two ancient symbols she once saw in a prehistoric salt mine. While there she uncovers a Nazi plot to disrupt the Salzburg Festival of 1935 by kidnapping Maestro Toscanini.
— Read on www.dorothyjanemills.com/about-the-sceptre/

Sports History – Dorothy Jane Mills

As the widow of Dr. Harold Seymour, the first and leading historian of baseball, I was for 40 years closely involved with the field of baseball history, doing his research, organization, correspondence, and even a lot of his writing.
— Read on www.dorothyjanemills.com/sports-history/

Drawing Card: A Baseball Novel: Dorothy Seymour Mills: 9780786468140: Amazon.com: Books

Drawing Card: A Baseball Novel [Dorothy Seymour Mills] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. In the early 20th century, two female baseball players signed with minor league teams only to have their contracts canceled when their gender became public. They withdrew politely
— Read on www.amazon.com/Drawing-Card-Dorothy-Seymour-Mills/dp/0786468149/ref=nodl_

“Baseball: The People’s Game,” was written by Dorothy Jane Mills – Naples News

“Baseball: The People’s Game,” was written by Dorothy Jane Mills, a Naples author and an authority on the sport, and her late husband Harold Seymour.
— Read on www.naplesnews.com/story/news/local/2016/07/09/naples-woman-her-book-help-baseball-documentary/86872018/

Amazon.com: Baseball: The Early Years (Oxford Paperbacks) (9780195059120): Harold Seymour, Dorothy Seymour Mills, Dorothy Z. Seymour, Dorothy Jane Mills: Books

Amazon.com: Baseball: The Early Years (Oxford Paperbacks) (9780195059120): Harold Seymour, Dorothy Seymour Mills, Dorothy Z. Seymour, Dorothy Jane Mills: Books
— Read on www.amazon.com/Baseball-Early-Years-Oxford-Paperbacks/dp/0195059123/ref=nodl_

Dorothy Seymour Mills Lifetime Achievement Award (Women in Baseball) | Society for American Baseball Research

Dorothy Seymour Mills Lifetime Achievement Award (Women in Baseball) | Society for American Baseball Research
— Read on sabr.org/about/dorothy-award-women-baseball

Dorothy Jane Mills – Author, Editor, Consultant, Speaker

Dorothy Jane Mills is an author, editor, consultant and speaker who has written numerous sports history, historical fiction and children’s books. As the widow of baseball’s leading historian, Dr. Harold Seymour, she was his co-author in the classic series on baseball history they wrote together.
— Read on www.dorothyjanemills.com/

The official website of Dorothy Jane Mills

The official website of Dorothy Jane Mills

“Who Ever Heard of a Girls’ Baseball Club?” By Dorothy Jane Mills

Who Ever Heard of a Girls’ Baseball Club? gives readers the real story of the way girls and women formed their own clubs, traveled around the country playing all comers, and enjoyed the thrill of success in baseball. Through this book readers will find out how girls got to play in the Little League, how some managed to play in high school and college, and how some have formed elite teams to compete in tournaments and even with foreign women’s teams in other countries. Their strongest opponent? The national girls’ team of Japan.

To make Who Ever Heard of a Girls’ Baseball Club? easily accessible to young people, the publisher Thinker Media, Inc., will prepare it as an electronic book for the iPad, Kindle, Nook, and Kobo. It will also available directly from the bookstore of Thinker Media at ThinkerBooks.com.

“Who Ever Heard of a Girls’ Baseball Club?” By Dorothy Jane Mills

Blog: Sept. 8, 2012 – The official website of Dorothy Jane Mills

Lately I’ve been under the vague impression that other writers ideas were bouncing off my own and that Ive been catching the deflections. For years I’ve been saying that women in baseball deserve much more media attention. Now other writers with much more clout than I have begun talking about women in athletics…

via Blog: Sept. 8, 2012.

It’s our national game, too – By Dorothy Jane Mills – from The Hardball Times

Many baseball men have no idea that women possess a solid history in baseball since the 1860s, with each generation producing some good players who might have at least made the minor leagues if men had permitted them to show their talents. Today’s female baseball players (and umpires) have a hard time getting recognition for their abilities.

When baseball fans and baseball officials begin to realize that women really do play the National Game, scouts and managers may turn from the Caribbean back to their own home shores for the development of future major leaguers. Look around, guys, for what’s right under your noses. Many of these women have been playing baseball since they were five years old and don’t need to be taught how to do it.

via It’s our national game, too from The Hardball Times.

Dorothy Jane Mills – Drawing Card – Book now available!

Dorothy Jane Mills - Drawing Card - Book now available!

Dorothy Jane Mills – Drawing Card – Cover Art

Kindle and NOOK Editions now available!: New Release: Dorothy Seymour Mills: “First in the Field: My Journey as the First Woman Baseball Historian”

First in the Field: My Journey as the First Woman Baseball Historian by Dorothy Seymour Mills

amazon.com – Kindle edition – Barns & Noble – NOOK edition

Drawing Card: A Novel of a Woman in Baseball – Dorothy Jane Mills

Drawing Card: A Novel of a Woman in Baseball

… Drawing Card has already created a buzz of interest among those interested in baseball history. It’s the story of a woman who signed a minor-league baseball contract, which was then cancelled by the Commissioner of Baseball, and what she did about it.

In baseball history, two different female baseball players signed minor-league contracts, which were cancelled as soon as their gender became known, so they never had a chance to show what they could do. Evidently, they withdrew quietly and politely, as women generally did in those days.

But in Drawing Card, when Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis cancels Cleveland pitcher Annie Cardello’s signed minor-league contract, she vows to retaliate.

Annie’s volatile personality, coupled with her family background in ancient Sicily (shown in historical flashbacks), leads her to plan his murder.

Before she can complete her scheme, her attempt to help a brother in trouble leads to her participation in a different murder, one in which the Mafia has an interest.

Most of Drawing Card takes place in Cleveland, Ohio, where I grew up. If you know the city, you’ll recognize the landmarks.

A few baseball specialists are reading the unedited manuscript of Drawing Card. One has reacted to his reading this way: “Wonderful, wonderful! Couldn’t put it down until my eyes were closing each night.” He calls the book “extraordinary” and “compelling…”

Dorothy Jane Mills: Straightening the Record – By Alan Schwarz – Published: March 6, 2010 – nytimes.com

Straightening the Record – By – Published: March 6, 2010 – nytimes.com

SABR Ends Controversy, Gives Credit to Historian’s Wife

… When SABR announced recipients of its Henry Chadwick Award on Monday, essentially choosing the Ruths and Mantles for its own Cooperstown, Seymour was an obvious choice among “The Glory of Their Times” author Lawrence S. Ritter, the statistical analyst Bill James and others. Mills received only glancing mention in Seymour’s citation. This so infuriated Mills and caused such an uprising among some of the 329 female members of SABR that the three-man selection committee reconsidered its stance, and the organization’s core purpose, over the next 48 hours.

“We had believed we would exceed our role in rendering a verdict on the controversy,” said John Thorn, a prominent baseball historian who is a member of the committee. “But it was in error because we weren’t aware at how making no decision was making a decision.”

He added that he was convinced Mills was the books’ full co-author.

“I do believe I have a heightened sense because of this unusual experience this week,” he said. “A heightened sense of responsibility — to correct historical error…”

New Book: Chasing Baseball – Our Obsession with Its History, Numbers, People and Places – By Dorothy Seymour Mills –

Chasing Baseball received a starred review by Library Journal in its annual “Baseball Roundup” article. It’s the hope of publishers to land a couple of title in the article, which serves as a best-of guide for librarians. A starred review comes rarely–and this year there were only three out of 22…

Mills, Dorothy Seymour. Chasing Baseball: Our Obsession with Its History, Numbers, People and Places. McFarland. Apr. 2010. c.478p. bibliog. index. ISBN 978-0-7864-4289-8. pap. $39.95.

Mills is a veteran baseball author, but much was in uncredited assistance to her husband, the late pioneering baseball scholar Harold Seymour. Now she presents her own first-person examination of the assumptions that surround baseball—e.g., its American origins and its necessary masculinity. Elegantly and calmly, she sets us straight, crediting other SABR researchers along the way. In Part 1, “A Manly Pursuit,” she casts a clear light on such trends as fantasy baseball, growing even as the watching of baseball itself has declined, with sandlot, street, and amateur baseball almost extinct. She reminds us that baseball, as our national pastime, has represented our country at its most disturbing, supporting not only segregation in the past but “faith nights” now, which impose evangelical Christianity on passively consenting fans. In Part 2, “A Womanly Pursuit,” Mills notes the women who have in fact played baseball, albeit excluded from the MLB and subject to ridicule, and the responsibility of collegiate sports and the Little League in shunting women into softball. A fascinating read that will be especially inspiring for women who love the game

Chasing Baseball – Our Obsession with Its History, Numbers, People and Places
By Dorothy Seymour Mills
Foreword by Richard C. Crepeau

$39.95 softcover
Bibliography, index
ISBN 978-0-7864-4289-8
2010

From Books

Despite worries about baseball’s decline, deep interest in memorabilia, fantasy baseball, exhibits, and the games themselves indicate the sport is surviving steroid scandals, negative publicity, and the perception that the game is more nostalgia than a part of current popular culture. This book shows that while basket- ball and football might enjoy wider popularity today, no sport elicits the passion—or inspires the slightly off-kilter, obsessive behavior—that baseball does.

Writer and consultant Dorothy Seymour Mills is the author of seventeen books. The first female historian in the Society for American Baseball Research, she is a member of the Association for Women in Sports Media. She lives in Naples, Florida.

To order the book direct from publisher click, here, to view and download the order form – or click, here, to order from their web site.

Otherwise, you can order from amazon.com, here, or any other established – or independent – retailer.

About “Signs of the Time” – Who invented umpires’ signals? Does anybody really know? – by Dorothy Jane Mills

About “Signs of the Time” – by Dorothy Jane Mills

Who invented umpires’ signals? Does anybody really know?

Relatives of the famous deaf and non-speaking big-league player William “Dummy” Hoy believe it was his participation in baseball that inspired umpires to use hand signals to supplement their calls of “safe,” “out,” and other events in the game. Those of the well-known umpire Bill “Catfish” Klem are sure that Klem started it all, mostly because of Klem’s constant insistence that he was the one who began using signs and that others copied him.

In “Signs of the Time,” two filmmakers, Don Casper and Jim Hughes, of Crystal Pix, Inc., have produced a solid and lively documentary about the controversy over who invented umpires’ signals. After showing us the way early umpires workd and then devoting considerable time to the evidence produced by the Hoy supporters and the claims of the Klem side, Casper and Hughes also bring in two well-known baseball historians, Dorothy Seymour Mills and Peter Morris, who because of their research know that even before Hoy and Klem participated in baseball, fans reacting to the difficulty of hearing umpires’ calls in the bigger baseball parks were asking the umps to add signals to their voice calls. The umpires hung back for a long time, fearing that these gyrations might detract from their dignity. Not until early in the 20th century did they all agree to give these signals, or “signs,” as they are called in baseball.

During 2009 “Signs of the Time” has been shown in many venues throughout the country, mostly at various film festivals. During the Annual Cooperstown Film Festival October 2-4, “Signs of the Time” became one of the thirteen entries in the competition and won the Award for Baseball Excellence. This Award is given to the film that excels in one or all of the following categories: research, historical context, appreciation of the game and the embodiment of the spirit of baseball.

Our Mothers’ Game: Women in Baseball by Dorothy Seymour Mills

Our Mothers’ Game: Women in Baseball

Dorothy Seymour Mills

“Women have successfully invaded the male sanctuary whose door men are least likely to unlatch for them: the world of baseball.

Men passionate about baseball, especially about the history of the national game, have for thirty-eight years participated in the international group called the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR), a group that stands at the top of the heap for solid, dependable baseball information. Fans come to conferences and conventions of this 6,500-member international group to hobnob with baseball authors, hear presentations disclosing the results of the latest scholarly research on baseball, and wallow in the authors’ books and articles…”

To read the entire article, click, here

Since historians already recognized Mills as co-author of these groundbreaking books in the field, OUP decided in 2010 to credit her appropriately… – Announcing the Availability of Autographed Copies of the Newly Revised Oxford University Press Edition of the Seymour-Mills Baseball Series

Announcing the Availability of Autographed Copies of the Newly Revised Oxford University Press Edition of the Seymour-Mills Baseball Series

Dorothy Seymour Mills, co-author with Dr. Harold Seymour of the classic three-volume history of baseball published from 1960-90 by Oxford University Press, announces that autographed copies of the new edition of these books are now available for purchase through her website, www.dorothyjanemills.com.

Since historians already recognized Mills as co-author of these groundbreaking books in the field, OUP decided in 2010 to credit her appropriately.

In the new edition of Baseball: The Early Years and Baseball: The Golden Age, the front covers and title pages reflect Mills as co-author.

For the third volume, Baseball: The Golden Age, the order of the authors’ names is reversed to make clear that Mills was the senior author.

These books also include a description of Mills on the back covers, along with a publisher’s note on the copyright pages explaining why the new edition is being published.

This welcome change comes in time for the new edition of these books  to be available for the Christmas trade.

The new edition of the classic history of baseball can be ordered through the “Order Books” tab at http://www.dorothyjanemills.com.

Purchases can be made online by credit card or PayPal, but Mills will also accept checks for those who prefer to use a mail-in order form. Autographed copies of Mills’s other books are also available at the website: her latest, Chasing Baseball (McFarland 2011); her professional autobiography, A Woman’s Work (McFarland 2004); her historical novels; her children’s books, including the popular Ann Likes Red; and her vegetarian cookbook.

Mills’s earlier works are out of print but sometimes available at websites specializing in rare books.

Mills will make signed copies of her forthcoming historical novel, Drawing Card, available on her website as well. Drawing Card, now in press at McFarland, is based on a “high concept” idea —one that can be stated succinctly as a “What if . . . ?” proposition. The premise of Drawing Card is “What if a woman whose minor-league baseball contract is cancelled by the Commissioner cannot accept her rejection and decides to do something drastic about it?”

More information and details about Drawing Card, anticipated from McFarland in January 2012, is available on Mills’ website,www.dorothyjanemills.com.

Linedrives and Lipstick – San Francisco Public Library, Main Branch – January 25 – March 16, 2014

Opening event: Sunday, January 26, Main Library, Koret auditorium, come meet baseball scholars David Block, Jean Ardell, Dorothy Mills, Leslie Heaphy and Monica Nucciarone as they discuss the history of women in baseball

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Celebrate the opening of the Linedrives and Lipstick exhibit at the 4th annual SABR Day, hosted by the Lefty O’Doul SABR Chapter and the San Francisco Public Library. Sunday, January 26, 2014 1pm-4pm – SABR Day 2014

Celebrate the opening of the Linedrives and Lipstick exhibit at the 4thannual SABR Day, hosted by the Lefty O’Doul SABR Chapter and the San Francisco Public Library.

Sunday, January 26, 2014

1pm-4pm

Koret Auditorium, San Francisco Main Library, Civic Center

The public is invited and there is no charge for this event

Be among the first to visit this wonderful exhibit honoring the All American Girls Professional Baseball League and enjoy an afternoon learning more about the many roles that women have played in America’s pastime. Read more about the exhibit at

Linedrives and lipstick

We have invited an All-Star panel of baseball scholars to discuss women in baseball: Jean Ardell, David Block, Leslie Heaphy, Dorothy Mills and Monica Nucciarone.

SABR members , this is an opportunity to showcase SABR to a wider audience.

Please join us for the event . I’d also like to go over to Lefty O’douls after for more SABR fellowship.

Please feel free to invite family and friends. There is no charge for this meeting.

The San Francisco Main Library is at the SF Civic Center. It is very convenient to the Civic Center BART station. There is limited street parking and an underground garage nearby.

If you have questions please call or email.

http://chapters.sabr.org/leftyodoul/chapter-news/upcoming-events/details/20-sabr-day-2014

Celebrate the opening of the Linedrives and Lipstick exhibit at the 4th annual SABR Day, hosted by the Left y O’Doul SABR Chapter and the San Francisco Public Library. Sunday, January 26, 2014 1pm-4pm – SA BR Day 2014

Celebrate the opening of theLinedrives and Lipstickexhibit at the 4thannual SABR Day, hosted by the Lefty O’Doul SABR Chapter and the San Francisco Public Library.

Sunday, January 26, 2014

1pm-4pm

Koret Auditorium, San Francisco Main Library, Civic Center

The public is invited and there is no charge for this event

Be among the first to visit this wonderful exhibit honoring the All American Girls Professional Baseball League and enjoy an afternoon learning more about the many roles that women have played in America’s pastime. Read more about the exhibit at

Linedrives and lipstick

We have invited an All-Star panel of baseball scholars to discuss women in baseball: Jean Ardell, David Block, Leslie Heaphy, Dorothy Mills and Monica Nucciarone.

SABR members , this is an opportunity to showcase SABR to a wider audience.

Please join us for the event . I’d also like to go over to Lefty O’douls after for more SABR fellowship.

Please feel free to invite family and friends. There is no charge for this meeting.

The San Francisco Main Library is at the SF Civic Center. It is very convenient to the Civic Center BART station. There is limited street parking and an underground garage nearby.

If you have questions please call or email.

http://chapters.sabr.org/leftyodoul/chapter-news/upcoming-events/details/20-sabr-day-201420140125-130342.jpg

HardballChat Radio: Episode 22 | Hardballchat.com

Another fantastic show is in the books! Scott and Hudson are joined by an all-star crew of guests for a comprehensive discussion of women in baseball. The women include: Dorothy Mills, Meredith Wills, Justine Siegal, and Cami Kidder.

Dorothy Mills is a baseball historian and the author of several books, including a new book, Drawing Card: A Novel of a Woman in Baseball, which is set to come out next month. Drawing Card is the story of a woman who is signed to a minor league contract, only to see it cancelled by the Commissioner. Rather than accept the Commissioner’s ruling, the woman fights back. Based off a true story, Drawing Cardpromises to be an awesome read. You can find more information about the book, as well as the rest of Dorothy’s endeavors, at www.dorothyjanemills.com…

via HardballChat Radio: Episode 22 | Hardballchat.com.

SABR: Baseball historian isn’t out in left field – By Cynthia England – Collier Citizen – Wednesday, September 12, 2007

“Baseball historian isn’t out in left field” – By Cynthia England – Collier Citizen – Wednesday, September 12, 2007

“Dorothy Mills has made a name for herself as the first woman historian of baseball, but says she’s not a fan and she doesn’t enjoy going to ball games.

From Our Mothers’ Game

Mills outlined her baseball research and shared a few opinions during a special presentation for residents of The Carlisle, where she lives.

She first became immersed in the game of baseball while helping her late husband, Dr. Harold Seymour, write his baseball trilogy, which includes ‘Baseball: The Early Years,’ ‘Baseball: The Golden Age,’ and ‘Baseball: The People’s Game.’

Mills helped with research, organizing material, outlining notes, planning chapters, handling correspondence and even doing a lot of writing. In fact, she completed the third book of the trilogy herself after her husband became terminally ill.

The focus of her discussion was women in baseball. She said women have been playing the game since at least the 1870s….”

Naples author, 89, pens novels focusing on assisted living

Naples author Dorothy Jane Mills has finished a book series about life in an assisted-living facility, titled “Don’t Admit You’re in Assisted Living.”

Source: Naples author, 89, pens novels focusing on assisted living

June 28, 2012 – Women in Baseball Panel of Authors and Experts – SABR Convention – sabr.org

http://sabr.org/convention

Here’s the description of the Women in Baseball panel:

Women in Baseball Panel
4:45-6:15 p.m., Thursday, June 28
Ballroom 1-2 
Our panel of authors and experts will discuss the evolution of women in baseball throughout the game’s history and their future in the sport. Speakers include:

Laura Day, who has served as Executive Vice President of Business Development for the Minnesota Twins since 2006. She oversees the team’s revenue generation, including ticket sales and corporate partnerships, and played a key role in the Twins’ transition from the Metrodome to Target Field in 2010. Prior to joining the Twins, she worked at the Minneapolis Convention and Visitor’s Association and served as vice president of sales for Victory Sports One. She was one of the first employees of the Minnesota Wild hockey team, helping to launch the Xcel Energy Center as vice president of corporate partnerships from 1999 to 2002. Laura got her start in sports working for the Twins from 1991 to 1999, where he held a variety of posts, including vice president of sales and marketing; director of corporate marketing; and promotions manager.

Leslie Heaphy, a member of SABR since 1989 and chair of SABR’s Women in Baseball Committee since 1995. She was elected to the SABR Board of Directors in 2010. Leslie is an associate professor of history at Kent State University at Stark and publishes in the area of the Negro Leagues and women’s baseball. In 2008, she became the founding editor of the journal Black Ball, published by McFarland Publishing. She lives in Kent, Ohio.

Dorothy Seymour Mills, a pioneer among baseball historians. With her late husband, Dr. Harold Seymour, she co-authored the classic three-book series called Baseball, published by Oxford University Press. In 2010, the couple were selected as part of the inaugural class of recipients for SABR’s Henry Chadwick Award, which honors the game’s greatest researchers, historians, statisticians, analysts and archivists. She also authored A Woman’s Work: Writing Baseball History with Harold Seymour (McFarland & Co., 2004), which revealed her contributions to the Baseball series — after not receiving credit for her work for many decades, Dorothy was finally listed as the co-author when OUP re-released the books in 2010. Her most recent books are Chasing Baseball: Our Obsession With Its History, Numbers, People and Places and Drawing Card: A Baseball Novel.

Cecilia Tan, SABR’s Publications Editor since 2011. Cecilia has been involved in baseball in one way or another since she fell in love with the 1976 New York Yankees. She writes the oldest baseball blog on the Internet, “Why I Like Baseball”, and played second base/right field for the Pawtucket Slaterettes, the oldest continuously operating all-female baseball league in the country. Early in her baseball writing career, she was a web writer for the New York Yankees. She currently serves as Publications Editor for SABR and this past winter was a co-editor of the Baseball Prospectus Annual.

Moderator: Ann Carroll, three-time Emmy Award-winning host/reporter for Fox Sports North. Since 2006, she has been the host/producer and reporter for the “Vikings Weekly” magazine TV show. She has also worked as a sports anchor and sideline reporter at TV stations in Duluth, Minnesota; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Kansas City, Missouri; and St. Louis, Missouri, covering Major League Baseball, the National Football League, the National Hockey League, college football and basketball, and other sports. She is a graduate of St. Cloud State University and a native of Edina, Minnesota.

Women and girls in Baseball – Daily Diamond Stories | Baseball Hall of Fame

Daily Diamonds stories:

Effa Manley, the Colorado Silver BulletsHilda Chester,Edith Houghton, the All-American Girls Professional Baseball LeagueAmanda ClementJulie CrouteauChelsea BakerToni StoneClaire SmithEri YoshidaHelene BrittonSuzyn WaldmanCorinne Hillman, the movie A League of Their OwnDorothy Seymour MillsMelissa Ludke, the Pawtucket SlaterettesEleanor EngleMaria PepePam PostemaHelen DauvrayJanet MacFarlaneBrita Meng OutzenMargaret GisoloSr. Mary AssumptaSonia Sotomayor, Linda Alvarado and Babe Didrickson Zaharias.

via Building a Legacy | Baseball Hall of Fame.

Oxford University Press, Inc (OUP USA) ACKNOWLEDGES WIFE’S CONTRIBUTION TO BASEBALL BOOKS

New York City, July 21, 2010—Oxford University Press, Inc (OUP USA) today made public that it would credit Dorothy Seymour Mills as co-author of the three baseball histories previously “authored” solely by her late husband, Harold Seymour. OUP USA Executive Editor Tim Bent, said, “I am happy to announce that at long last Dorothy Seymour Mills will be given formal credit on the books she wrote with her late husband. I know this news will be warmly welcomed by those familiar with those books and their genesis. We’re keen and delighted to officially set matters straight.”

According to Mills, “By the time we started the first book, which was based on the dissertation I helped him to research and write, I was already his co-author. I enjoyed using my skills in research, organization, and writing on this project, and we worked together well as a team, although I soon recognized that I was performing work that he was getting credit for. But I also knew that if I stopped work on the project, it would fail, and I had invested too much of myself in it to want that to happen.”

The Seymours collaborated on Baseball: The Early Years (1960), Baseball: The Golden Age (1971) and Baseball: The People’s Game (1990).

“In 2000 I published an article explaining the way Seymour and I worked together and demonstrating that I was his colleague, not his assistant, in the preparation of all the work published under his name,” noted Mills. “With the appearance of this article, I received many letters from both women and men telling about the way men writers used their wives’ work without crediting them.

I’m very much gratified that my name will finally appear on the title pages of these three books, where it has belonged since 1960, when the first book in the series was published.

This year not only marks the hundredth anniversary of Seymour’s birth, it is the fiftieth anniversary of the year we published our first book together. So this is an appropriate moment in history to correct the record.”

Purdy

Director of Publicity

Oxford University Press

198 Madison Ave.

New York, NY 10016

212.726.6032christian.purdy@oup.com